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Sensors 2016, 16(12), 2041; doi:10.3390/s16122041

Manipulation and Immobilization of a Single Fluorescence Nanosensor for Selective Injection into Cells

1
Department of Micro-Nano Systems Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603, Japan
2
Faculty of Engineering Technology, Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia, 86400 Parit Raja, Batu Pahat, Johor, Malaysia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: W. Rudolf Seitz
Received: 9 October 2016 / Revised: 21 November 2016 / Accepted: 29 November 2016 / Published: 1 December 2016
(This article belongs to the Section Chemical Sensors)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [6031 KB, uploaded 1 December 2016]   |  

Abstract

Manipulation and injection of single nanosensors with high cell viability is an emerging field in cell analysis. We propose a new method using fluorescence nanosensors with a glass nanoprobe and optical control of the zeta potential. The nanosensor is fabricated by encapsulating a fluorescence polystyrene nanobead into a lipid layer with 1,3,3-trimethylindolino-6′-nitrobenzopyrylospiran (SP), which is a photochromic material. The nanobead contains iron oxide nanoparticles and a temperature-sensitive fluorescent dye, Rhodamine B. The zeta potential of the nanosensor switches between negative and positive by photo-isomerization of SP with ultraviolet irradiation. The positively-charged nanosensor easily adheres to a negatively-charged glass nanoprobe, is transported to a target cell, and then adheres to the negatively-charged cell membrane. The nanosensor is then injected into the cytoplasm by heating with a near-infrared (NIR) laser. As a demonstration, a single 750 nm nanosensor was picked-up using a glass nanoprobe with optical control of the zeta potential. Then, the nanosensor was transported and immobilized onto a target cell membrane. Finally, it was injected into the cytoplasm using a NIR laser. The success rates of pick-up and cell immobilization of the nanosensor were 75% and 64%, respectively. Cell injection and cell survival rates were 80% and 100%, respectively. View Full-Text
Keywords: nanosensor; fluorescence sensor; photochromism; zeta potential; cell injection nanosensor; fluorescence sensor; photochromism; zeta potential; cell injection
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Hashim, H.; Maruyama, H.; Masuda, T.; Arai, F. Manipulation and Immobilization of a Single Fluorescence Nanosensor for Selective Injection into Cells. Sensors 2016, 16, 2041.

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