Next Article in Journal
Automated Tracking of Drosophila Specimens
Previous Article in Journal
A Distributed Data-Gathering Protocol Using AUV in Underwater Sensor Networks
Previous Article in Special Issue
Nucleic Acid Aptamers: An Emerging Tool for Biotechnology and Biomedical Sensing
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Sensors 2015, 15(8), 19351-19368; doi:10.3390/s150819351

Mass Detection in Viscous Fluid Utilizing Vibrating Micro- and Nanomechanical Mass Sensors under Applied Axial Tensile Force

1
Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Kaohsiung University of Applied Sciences, Kaohsiung 80778, Taiwan
2
Institute of Physics, Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague 18221, Czech Republic
3
Advanced Institute of Manufacturing with High-tech Innovations (AIM-HI), National Chung Cheng University, Chiayi County 62102, Taiwan
4
Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Chung Cheng University, Chiayi County 62102, Taiwan
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Yeshaiahu Fainman
Received: 7 May 2015 / Revised: 13 July 2015 / Accepted: 15 July 2015 / Published: 6 August 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Resonant Sensors and Sensor Fusion)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1148 KB, uploaded 6 August 2015]   |  

Abstract

Vibrating micro- and nanomechanical mass sensors are capable of quantitatively determining attached mass from only the first three (two) measured cantilever (suspended) resonant frequencies. However, in aqueous solutions that are relevant to most biological systems, the mass determination is challenging because the quality factor (Q-factor) due to fluid damping decreases and, as a result, usually just the fundamental resonant frequencies can be correctly identified. Moreover, for higher modes the resonance coupling, noise, and internal damping have been proven to strongly affect the measured resonances and, correspondingly, the accuracy of estimated masses. In this work, a technique capable of determining the mass for the cantilever and also the position of nanobeads attached on the vibrating micro-/nanomechanical beam under intentionally applied axial tensile force from the measured fundamental flexural resonant frequencies is proposed. The axial force can be created and controlled through an external electrostatic or magnetostatic field. Practicality of the proposed technique is confirmed on the suspended multi-walled carbon nanotube and the rectangular silicon cantilever-based mass sensors. We show that typically achievable force resolution has a negligibly small impact on the accuracy of mass measurement. View Full-Text
Keywords: mass resonator sensors; cantilever mass sensors; resonant frequency; carbon nanotube; viscous fluid; beam under tension; mass detection in fluid mass resonator sensors; cantilever mass sensors; resonant frequency; carbon nanotube; viscous fluid; beam under tension; mass detection in fluid
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Stachiv, I.; Fang, T.-H.; Jeng, Y.-R. Mass Detection in Viscous Fluid Utilizing Vibrating Micro- and Nanomechanical Mass Sensors under Applied Axial Tensile Force. Sensors 2015, 15, 19351-19368.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Sensors EISSN 1424-8220 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top