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Sensors 2015, 15(3), 6221-6240; doi:10.3390/s150306221

Adjusting Spectral Indices for Spectral Response Function Differences of Very High Spatial Resolution Sensors Simulated from Field Spectra

Faculty of Geo-Information Science and Earth Observation (ITC), University of Twente, PO Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede, The Netherlands
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Academic Editor: Assefa M. Melesse
Received: 31 October 2014 / Revised: 15 December 2014 / Accepted: 11 February 2015 / Published: 13 March 2015
(This article belongs to the Section Remote Sensors)
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Abstract

The use of data from multiple sensors is often required to ensure data coverage and continuity, but differences in the spectral characteristics of sensors result in spectral index values being different. This study investigates spectral response function effects on 48 spectral indices for cultivated grasslands using simulated data of 10 very high spatial resolution sensors, convolved from field reflectance spectra of a grass covered dike (with varying vegetation condition). Index values for 48 indices were calculated for original narrow-band spectra and convolved data sets, and then compared. The indices Difference Vegetation Index (DVI), Global Environmental Monitoring Index (GEMI), Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI), Modified Soil-Adjusted Vegetation Index (MSAVI2) and Soil-Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI), which include the difference between the near-infrared and red bands, have values most similar to those of the original spectra across all 10 sensors (1:1 line mean 1:1R2 > 0.960 and linear trend mean ccR2 > 0.997). Additionally, relationships between the indices’ values and two quality indicators for grass covered dikes were compared to those of the original spectra. For the soil moisture indicator, indices that ratio bands performed better across sensors than those that difference bands, while for the dike cover quality indicator, both the choice of bands and their formulation are important. View Full-Text
Keywords: cross-calibration; data continuity; dike; grass; levee; satellite; spectral index; spectral response function effect; spectral resolution; UAV; very high spatial resolution sensor cross-calibration; data continuity; dike; grass; levee; satellite; spectral index; spectral response function effect; spectral resolution; UAV; very high spatial resolution sensor
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Cundill, S.L.; van der Werff, H.M.A.; van der Meijde, M. Adjusting Spectral Indices for Spectral Response Function Differences of Very High Spatial Resolution Sensors Simulated from Field Spectra. Sensors 2015, 15, 6221-6240.

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