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Sensors 2015, 15(12), 30443-30456; doi:10.3390/s151229808

Colloidal Stability and Magnetic Field-Induced Ordering of Magnetorheological Fluids Studied with a Quartz Crystal Microbalance

1
Institute of Physical and Information Technologies, CSIC, C/Serrano, 144, Madrid 28006, Spain
2
Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Sciences, University of Granada, c/Fuentenueva s/n, Granada 18071, Spain
3
Institute of Physical Chemistry, Clausthal University of Technology, Arnold-Sommerfeld-Str. 4, Clausthal Zellerfeld D-38678, Germany
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Vittorio M. N. Passaro
Received: 21 October 2015 / Revised: 20 November 2015 / Accepted: 30 November 2015 / Published: 4 December 2015
(This article belongs to the Section Physical Sensors)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [4249 KB, uploaded 4 December 2015]   |  

Abstract

This work proposes the use of quartz crystal microbalances (QCMs) as a method to analyze and characterize magnetorheological (MR) fluids. QCM devices are sensitive to changes in mass, surface interactions, and viscoelastic properties of the medium contacting its surface. These features make the QCM suitable to study MR fluids and their response to variable environmental conditions. MR fluids change their structure and viscoelastic properties under the action of an external magnetic field, this change being determined by the particle volume fraction, the magnetic field strength, and the presence of thixotropic agents among other factors. In this work, the measurement of the resonance parameters (resonance frequency and dissipation factor) of a QCM are used to analyze the behavior of MR fluids in static conditions (that is, in the absence of external mechanical stresses). The influence of sedimentation under gravity and the application of magnetic fields on the shifts of resonance frequency and dissipation factor were measured and discussed in the frame of the coupled resonance produced by particles touching the QCM surface. Furthermore, the MR-fluid/QCM system has a great potential for the study of high-frequency contact mechanics because the translational and rotational stiffness of the link between the surface and the particles can be tuned by the magnetic field. View Full-Text
Keywords: TSM resonator; magnetorheological fluid; QCM; positive resonant frequency shift; micron-sized magnetic particles; sedimentation; magnetic field intensity TSM resonator; magnetorheological fluid; QCM; positive resonant frequency shift; micron-sized magnetic particles; sedimentation; magnetic field intensity
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Rodriguez-López, J.; Castro, P.; de Vicente, J.; Johannsmann, D.; Elvira, L.; Morillas, J.R.; Montero de Espinosa, F. Colloidal Stability and Magnetic Field-Induced Ordering of Magnetorheological Fluids Studied with a Quartz Crystal Microbalance. Sensors 2015, 15, 30443-30456.

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