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Sensors 2014, 14(3), 4167-4176; doi:10.3390/s140304167

Towards Using NMR to Screen for Spoiled Tomatoes Stored in 1,000 L, Aseptically Sealed, Metal-Lined Totes

1
Department of Chemistry, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616, USA
2
The Morning Star Packing Company, Woodland, CA 95695, USA
3
Department of Food Science and Technology, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 28 November 2013 / Revised: 12 February 2014 / Accepted: 20 February 2014 / Published: 3 March 2014
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Magnetic Resonance Sensors)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [331 KB, uploaded 21 June 2014]   |  

Abstract

Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is used to track factory relevant tomato paste spoilage. It was found that spoilage in tomato paste test samples leads to longer spin lattice relaxation times T1 using a conventional low magnetic field NMR system. The increase in T1 value for contaminated samples over a five day room temperature exposure period prompted the work to be extended to the study of industry standard, 1,000 L, non-ferrous, metal-lined totes. NMR signals and T1 values were recovered from a large format container with a single-sided NMR sensor. The results of this work suggest that a handheld NMR device can be used to study tomato paste spoilage in factory process environments. View Full-Text
Keywords: nuclear magnetic resonance; tomato paste; spoilage; single-sided coil; T1 relaxation; saturation recovery; metal container nuclear magnetic resonance; tomato paste; spoilage; single-sided coil; T1 relaxation; saturation recovery; metal container
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 3.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Pinter, M.D.; Harter, T.; McCarthy, M.J.; Augustine, M.P. Towards Using NMR to Screen for Spoiled Tomatoes Stored in 1,000 L, Aseptically Sealed, Metal-Lined Totes. Sensors 2014, 14, 4167-4176.

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