Sensors 2010, 10(8), 7404-7420; doi:10.3390/s100807404
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Use of Sensors in the Treatment and Follow-up of Patients with Diabetes Mellitus

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Received: 29 June 2010; in revised form: 28 July 2010 / Accepted: 6 August 2010 / Published: 9 August 2010
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Glucose Sensors)
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract: Glucose control is the cornerstone of Diabetes Mellitus (DM) treatment. Although self-regulation using capillary glycemia (SRCG) still remains the best procedure in clinical practice, continuous glucose monitoring systems (CGM) offer the possibility of continuous and dynamic assessment of interstitial glucose concentration. CGM systems have the potential to improve glycemic control while decreasing the incidence of hypoglycemia but the efficiency, compared with SRCG, is still debated. CGM systems have the greatest potential value in patients with hypoglycemic unawareness and in controlling daily fluctuations in blood glucose. The implementation of continuous monitoring in the standard clinical setting has not yet been established but a new generation of open and close loop subcutaneous insulin infusion devices are emerging making insulin treatment and glycemic control more reliable.Glucose control is the cornerstone of Diabetes Mellitus (DM) treatment. Although self-regulation using capillary glycemia (SRCG) still remains the best procedure in clinical practice, continuous glucose monitoring systems (CGM) offer the possibility of continuous and dynamic assessment of interstitial glucose concentration. CGM systems have the potential to improve glycemic control while decreasing the incidence of hypoglycemia but the efficiency, compared with SRCG, is still debated. CGM systems have the greatest potential value in patients with hypoglycemic unawareness and in controlling daily fluctuations in blood glucose. The implementation of continuous monitoring in the standard clinical setting has not yet been established but a new generation of open and close loop subcutaneous insulin infusion devices are emerging making insulin treatment and glycemic control more reliable.
Keywords: diabetes mellitus; sensors; glucose controldiabetes mellitus; sensors; glucose control
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MDPI and ACS Style

Torres, I.; Baena, M.G.; Cayon, M.; Ortego-Rojo, J.; Aguilar-Diosdado, M. Use of Sensors in the Treatment and Follow-up of Patients with Diabetes Mellitus. Sensors 2010, 10, 7404-7420.

AMA Style

Torres I, Baena MG, Cayon M, Ortego-Rojo J, Aguilar-Diosdado M. Use of Sensors in the Treatment and Follow-up of Patients with Diabetes Mellitus. Sensors. 2010; 10(8):7404-7420.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Torres, Isabel; Baena, Maria G.; Cayon, Manuel; Ortego-Rojo, Jose; Aguilar-Diosdado, Manuel. 2010. "Use of Sensors in the Treatment and Follow-up of Patients with Diabetes Mellitus." Sensors 10, no. 8: 7404-7420.

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