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Sensors 2010, 10(8), 7404-7420; doi:10.3390/s100807404

Use of Sensors in the Treatment and Follow-up of Patients with Diabetes Mellitus

Endocrinology and Nutrition Service, Hospital Puerta del Mar, Ana de Viya 21, 11009 Cadiz, Spain
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Received: 29 June 2010 / Revised: 28 July 2010 / Accepted: 6 August 2010 / Published: 9 August 2010
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Glucose Sensors)
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Abstract

Glucose control is the cornerstone of Diabetes Mellitus (DM) treatment. Although self-regulation using capillary glycemia (SRCG) still remains the best procedure in clinical practice, continuous glucose monitoring systems (CGM) offer the possibility of continuous and dynamic assessment of interstitial glucose concentration. CGM systems have the potential to improve glycemic control while decreasing the incidence of hypoglycemia but the efficiency, compared with SRCG, is still debated. CGM systems have the greatest potential value in patients with hypoglycemic unawareness and in controlling daily fluctuations in blood glucose. The implementation of continuous monitoring in the standard clinical setting has not yet been established but a new generation of open and close loop subcutaneous insulin infusion devices are emerging making insulin treatment and glycemic control more reliable.Glucose control is the cornerstone of Diabetes Mellitus (DM) treatment. Although self-regulation using capillary glycemia (SRCG) still remains the best procedure in clinical practice, continuous glucose monitoring systems (CGM) offer the possibility of continuous and dynamic assessment of interstitial glucose concentration. CGM systems have the potential to improve glycemic control while decreasing the incidence of hypoglycemia but the efficiency, compared with SRCG, is still debated. CGM systems have the greatest potential value in patients with hypoglycemic unawareness and in controlling daily fluctuations in blood glucose. The implementation of continuous monitoring in the standard clinical setting has not yet been established but a new generation of open and close loop subcutaneous insulin infusion devices are emerging making insulin treatment and glycemic control more reliable. View Full-Text
Keywords: diabetes mellitus; sensors; glucose controldiabetes mellitus; sensors; glucose control diabetes mellitus; sensors; glucose controldiabetes mellitus; sensors; glucose control
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MDPI and ACS Style

Torres, I.; Baena, M.G.; Cayon, M.; Ortego-Rojo, J.; Aguilar-Diosdado, M. Use of Sensors in the Treatment and Follow-up of Patients with Diabetes Mellitus. Sensors 2010, 10, 7404-7420.

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