Diversity 2011, 3(1), 155-175; doi:10.3390/d3010155
Article

Invasion by Exotic Earthworms Alters Biodiversity and Communities of Litter- and Soil-dwelling Oribatid Mites

1 Daniel B. Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA, 30602, USA 2 Department of Zoology, Miami University, Oxford, OH, 45056, USA
* Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 3 January 2011; in revised form: 23 February 2011 / Accepted: 4 March 2011 / Published: 15 March 2011
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biological Invasion)
PDF Full-text Download PDF Full-Text [413 KB, uploaded 15 March 2011 14:14 CET]
Abstract: Exotic earthworms are drivers of biotic communities in invaded North American forest stands. Here we used ecologically important oribatid mite (Arachnida: Acari) communities, as model organisms to study the responses of litter- and soil-dwelling microarthropod communities to exotic earthworm invasion in a northern temperate forest. Litter- and soil-dwelling mites were sampled in 2008–2009 from forest areas: (1) with no earthworms; (2) those with epigeic and endogeic species, including Lumbricus rubellus Hoffmeister; and (3) those with epigeic, endogeic, and anecic earthworms including L. terrestris L. Species richness and diversity of litter- and soil-dwelling (0–2 cm soil depth) oribatid mites was 1–2 times higher in sites without earthworms than in sites with worms. Similarly, litter-dwelling oribatid mites were between 72 and 1,210 times more abundant in earthworm-free sites than in sites with worms. Among earthworm invaded sites, abundance of litter-dwelling oribatid mites in sites without the anecic L. terrestris was twice as high in May and 28 times higher in October, compared to sites with L. terrestris. Species richness, diversity, and abundance of oribatid mites were greater in litter-layers than in the soil-layers that showed a varied response to earthworm invasion. Species compositions of both litter- and soil-dwelling oribatid mite communities of forests with no earthworms were markedly different from those with earthworms. We conclude that exotic earthworm invasions are associated with significant declines of species diversity, numbers, and compositional shifts in litter- and soil-inhabiting communities. These faunal shifts may contribute to earthworm effects on soil processes and food web dynamics in historically earthworm-free, northern temperate forests.
Keywords: Acer spp.; biodiversity; earthworms; exotic species; litter layer; oribatid mites; soil layer

Article Statistics

Load and display the download statistics.

Citations to this Article

Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Burke, J.L.; Maerz, J.C.; Milanovich, J.R.; Fisk, M.C.; Gandhi, K.J. Invasion by Exotic Earthworms Alters Biodiversity and Communities of Litter- and Soil-dwelling Oribatid Mites. Diversity 2011, 3, 155-175.

AMA Style

Burke JL, Maerz JC, Milanovich JR, Fisk MC, Gandhi KJ. Invasion by Exotic Earthworms Alters Biodiversity and Communities of Litter- and Soil-dwelling Oribatid Mites. Diversity. 2011; 3(1):155-175.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Burke, Jordan L.; Maerz, John C.; Milanovich, Joseph R.; Fisk, Melany C.; Gandhi, Kamal J.K. 2011. "Invasion by Exotic Earthworms Alters Biodiversity and Communities of Litter- and Soil-dwelling Oribatid Mites." Diversity 3, no. 1: 155-175.

Diversity EISSN 1424-2818 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert