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Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19(2), 618; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms19020618

Preparation of Fish Skin Gelatin-Based Nanofibers Incorporating Cinnamaldehyde by Solution Blow Spinning

1
State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122, China
2
School of Food Science and Technology, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122, China
3
Department of Food Engineering, Ondokuz Mayis University, Samsun 55139, Turkey
4
Western Regional Research Center, ARS, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Albany, CA 94710, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 23 January 2018 / Revised: 12 February 2018 / Accepted: 13 February 2018 / Published: 22 February 2018
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Abstract

Cinnamaldehyde, a natural preservative that can non-specifically deactivate foodborne pathogens, was successfully incorporated into fish skin gelatin (FSG) solutions and blow spun into uniform nanofibers. The effects of cinnamaldehyde ratios (5–30%, w/w FSG) on physicochemical properties of fiber-forming emulsions (FFEs) and their nanofibers were investigated. Higher ratios resulted in higher values in particle size and viscosity of FFEs, as well as higher values in diameter of nanofibers. Loss of cinnamaldehyde was observed during solution blow spinning (SBS) process and cinnamaldehyde was mainly located on the surface of resultant nanofibers. Nanofibers all showed antibacterial activity by direct diffusion and vapor release against Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes. Inhibition zones increased as cinnamaldehyde ratio increased. Nanofibers showed larger inhibition effects than films prepared by casting method when S. typhimurium was exposed to the released cinnamaldehyde vapor, although films had higher remaining cinnamaldehyde than nanofibers after preparation. Lower temperature was favorable for cinnamaldehyde retention, and nanofibers added with 10% cinnamaldehyde ratio showed the highest retention over eight-weeks of storage. Results suggest that FSG nanofibers can be prepared by SBS as carriers for antimicrobials. View Full-Text
Keywords: gelatin; nanofibers; cinnamaldehyde; solution blow spinning; antimicrobial activity gelatin; nanofibers; cinnamaldehyde; solution blow spinning; antimicrobial activity
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Liu, F.; Türker Saricaoglu, F.; Avena-Bustillos, R.J.; Bridges, D.F.; Takeoka, G.R.; Wu, V.C.H.; Chiou, B.-S.; Wood, D.F.; McHugh, T.H.; Zhong, F. Preparation of Fish Skin Gelatin-Based Nanofibers Incorporating Cinnamaldehyde by Solution Blow Spinning. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19, 618.

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