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Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(8), 1628; doi:10.3390/ijms18081628

Sulfur Protects Pakchoi (Brassica chinensis L.) Seedlings against Cadmium Stress by Regulating Ascorbate-Glutathione Metabolism

1
College of Life Sciences, Northwest A&F University, Yangling 712100, China
2
College of Agronomy, Northwest A&F University, Yangling 712100, China
3
Innovation Experimental College, Northwest A&F University, Yangling 712100, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 15 June 2017 / Revised: 18 July 2017 / Accepted: 22 July 2017 / Published: 26 July 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Abiotic Stress and Gene Networks in Plants 2017)
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Abstract

Cadmium (Cd) pollution in food chains pose a potential health risk for humans. Sulfur (S) is a significant macronutrient that plays a significant role in the regulation of plant responses to diverse biotic and abiotic stresses. However, no information is currently available about the impact of S application on ascorbate-glutathione metabolism (ASA-GSH cycle) of Pakchoi plants under Cd stress. The two previously identified genotypes, namely, Aikangqing (a Cd-tolerant cultivar) and Qibaoqing (a Cd-sensitive cultivar), were utilized to investigate the role of S to mitigate Cd toxicity in Pakchoi plants under different Cd regimes. Results showed that Cd stress inhibited plant growth and induced oxidative stress. Exogenous application of S significantly increased the tolerance of Pakchoi seedlings suffering from Cd stress. This effect was demonstrated by increased growth parameters; stimulated activities of the antioxidant enzymes and upregulated genes involved in the ASA-GSH cycle and S assimilation; and by the enhanced ASA, GSH, phytochelatins, and nonprotein thiol production. This study shows that applying S nutrition can mitigate Cd toxicity in Pakchoi plants which has the potential in assisting the development of breeding strategies aimed at limiting Cd phytoaccumulation and decreasing Cd hazards in the food chain. View Full-Text
Keywords: cadmium; sulfur metabolism; ascorbate-glutathione cycle; transcriptional regulation; pakchoi cadmium; sulfur metabolism; ascorbate-glutathione cycle; transcriptional regulation; pakchoi
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Lou, L.; Kang, J.; Pang, H.; Li, Q.; Du, X.; Wu, W.; Chen, J.; Lv, J. Sulfur Protects Pakchoi (Brassica chinensis L.) Seedlings against Cadmium Stress by Regulating Ascorbate-Glutathione Metabolism. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18, 1628.

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