Next Article in Journal
Coadjuvants in the Diabetic Complications: Nutraceuticals and Drugs with Pleiotropic Effects
Previous Article in Journal
New Natural Pigment Fraction Isolated from Saw Palmetto: Potential for Adjuvant Therapy of Hepatocellular Carcinoma
Previous Article in Special Issue
RNase 7 in Cutaneous Defense
Article Menu
Issue 8 (August) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessReview
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(8), 1278; doi:10.3390/ijms17081278

The Ribonuclease A Superfamily in Humans: Canonical RNases as the Buttress of Innate Immunity

1
Department of Intensive Care and Intermediate Care, University Hospital Rheinisch-Westfälische Technische Hochschule (RWTH) Aachen, Aachen 52074, Germany
2
Department for Experimental Molecular Imaging, University Hospital RWTH Aachen and Helmholtz Institute for Biomedical Engineering, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen 52074, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Ester Boix
Received: 11 May 2016 / Revised: 29 July 2016 / Accepted: 1 August 2016 / Published: 5 August 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antimicrobial RNases in Host Defense)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1424 KB, uploaded 5 August 2016]   |  

Abstract

In humans, the ribonuclease A (RNase A) superfamily contains eight different members that have RNase activities, and all of these members are encoded on chromosome 14. The proteins are secreted by a large variety of different tissues and cells; however, a comprehensive understanding of these proteins’ physiological roles is lacking. Different biological effects can be attributed to each protein, including antiviral, antibacterial and antifungal activities as well as cytotoxic effects against host cells and parasites. Different immunomodulatory effects have also been demonstrated. This review summarizes the available data on the human RNase A superfamily and illustrates the significant role of the eight canonical RNases in inflammation and the host defence system against infections. View Full-Text
Keywords: human RNases; canonical RNases; secreted RNases; host defence protein; antimicrobial activity human RNases; canonical RNases; secreted RNases; host defence protein; antimicrobial activity
Figures

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Koczera, P.; Martin, L.; Marx, G.; Schuerholz, T. The Ribonuclease A Superfamily in Humans: Canonical RNases as the Buttress of Innate Immunity. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17, 1278.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Mol. Sci. EISSN 1422-0067 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top