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Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(3), 420; doi:10.3390/ijms17030420

Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation of the Supplementary Motor Area in the Treatment of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Multi-Site Study

1
Departments of Psychiatry, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON K7L 4X3, Canada
2
Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON K7L 4X3, Canada
3
Department of Psychiatry, Military Medical Academy, Sofia 1000, Bulgaria
4
Department of Psychiatry, Sincan State Hospital, Istanbul 34400, Turkey
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Kenji Hashimoto
Received: 2 November 2015 / Revised: 16 February 2016 / Accepted: 14 March 2016 / Published: 22 March 2016
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Abstract

Recently, strategies beyond pharmacological and psychological treatments have been developed for the management of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Specifically, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been employed as an adjunctive treatment in cases of treatment-refractory OCD. Here, we investigate six weeks of low frequency rTMS, applied bilaterally and simultaneously over the sensory motor area, in OCD patients in a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial. Twenty-two participants were randomly enrolled into the treatment (ACTIVE = 10) or placebo (SHAM = 12) groups. At each of seven visits (baseline; day 1 and weeks 2, 4, and 6 of treatment; and two and six weeks after treatment) the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) was administered. At the end of the six weeks of rTMS, patients in the ACTIVE group showed a clinically significant decrease in Y-BOCS scores compared to both the baseline and the SHAM group. This effect was maintained six weeks following the end of rTMS treatment. Therefore, in this sample, rTMS appeared to significantly improve the OCD symptoms of the treated patients beyond the treatment window. More studies need to be conducted to determine the generalizability of these findings and to define the duration of rTMS’ clinical effect on the Y-BOCS. Clinical Trial Registration Number (NCT) at www.clinicaltrials.gov: NCT00616486. View Full-Text
Keywords: Yale-Brown obsessive compulsive scale; sensory motor area; low-frequency rTMS Yale-Brown obsessive compulsive scale; sensory motor area; low-frequency rTMS
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Hawken, E.R.; Dilkov, D.; Kaludiev, E.; Simek, S.; Zhang, F.; Milev, R. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation of the Supplementary Motor Area in the Treatment of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Multi-Site Study. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17, 420.

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