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Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(2), 160; doi:10.3390/ijms17020160

The Potential of Plant Phenolics in Prevention and Therapy of Skin Disorders

1
Faculty of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw, Przybyszewskiego 63/77, 51-148 Wroclaw, Poland
2
Department of Genetics, Plant Breeding and Seed Production, Faculty of Life Sciences and Technology, Wroclaw University of Environmental and Plant Sciences, Plac Grunwaldzki 24A, 53-363 Wroclaw, Poland
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paula Andrade
Received: 27 November 2015 / Revised: 5 January 2016 / Accepted: 14 January 2016 / Published: 18 February 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Phenolics and Polyphenolics 2015)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [6132 KB, uploaded 18 February 2016]   |  

Abstract

Phenolic compounds constitute a group of secondary metabolites which have important functions in plants. Besides the beneficial effects on the plant host, phenolic metabolites (polyphenols) exhibit a series of biological properties that influence the human in a health-promoting manner. Evidence suggests that people can benefit from plant phenolics obtained either by the diet or through skin application, because they can alleviate symptoms and inhibit the development of various skin disorders. Due to their natural origin and low toxicity, phenolic compounds are a promising tool in eliminating the causes and effects of skin aging, skin diseases, and skin damage, including wounds and burns. Polyphenols also act protectively and help prevent or attenuate the progression of certain skin disorders, both embarrassing minor problems (e.g., wrinkles, acne) or serious, potentially life-threatening diseases such as cancer. This paper reviews the latest reports on the potential therapy of skin disorders through treatment with phenolic compounds, considering mostly a single specific compound or a combination of compounds in a plant extract. View Full-Text
Keywords: phenolic compounds; anti-aging properties; skin diseases; wound healing; antioxidant; anti-inflammatory; antimicrobial; anti-carcinogenic phenolic compounds; anti-aging properties; skin diseases; wound healing; antioxidant; anti-inflammatory; antimicrobial; anti-carcinogenic
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Działo, M.; Mierziak, J.; Korzun, U.; Preisner, M.; Szopa, J.; Kulma, A. The Potential of Plant Phenolics in Prevention and Therapy of Skin Disorders. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17, 160.

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