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Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2015, 16(3), 4985-4996; doi:10.3390/ijms16034985

Faldaprevir for the Treatment of Hepatitis C

1
Department of Gastroenterology and Nephrology, Chiba University, Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670, Japan
2
Yamanashi Hospitals (Central and Kita) Organization, 1-1-1 Fujimi, Kofu-shi, Yamanashi 400-8506, Japan
3
University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: William Chi-Shing Cho
Received: 17 January 2015 / Revised: 21 February 2015 / Accepted: 2 March 2015 / Published: 4 March 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Viral Hepatitis Research)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [797 KB, uploaded 4 March 2015]   |  

Abstract

The current treatments for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 infection are combinations of direct-acting antivirals, and faldaprevir is one of the new generation of HCV NS3/4A protease inhibitors. At the end of 2013, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the HCV NS3/4A protease inhibitor simeprevir and the HCV NS5B polymerase inhibitor sofosbuvir. Simeprevir or sofosbuvir in combination with pegylated interferon and ribavirin are available for clinical use. Faldaprevir, another HCV NS3/4A protease inhibitor that also has fewer adverse events than telaprevir or boceprevir, is under development. Of interest, faldaprevir in combination with pegylated interferon and ribavirin, and interferon-free treatment with faldaprevir in combination with deleobuvir plus ribavirin provides high sustained virological response rates for HCV genotype 1 infection. The aim of this article is to review these data concerning faldaprevir. Faldaprevir in combination with pegylated interferon and ribavirin treatment appears to be associated with fewer adverse events than telaprevir or boceprevir in combination with pegylated interferon and ribavirin, and may be one of the therapeutic options for treatment-naive patients with HCV genotype 1. The interferon-free combination of faldaprevir and deleobuvir with ribavirin was effective for HCV genotype 1 infection and may hold promise for interferon-ineligible and interferon-intolerant patients. View Full-Text
Keywords: chronic hepatitis C; direct-acting antivirals; faldaprevir; genotype 1; protease inhibitor chronic hepatitis C; direct-acting antivirals; faldaprevir; genotype 1; protease inhibitor
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Kanda, T.; Yokosuka, O.; Omata, M. Faldaprevir for the Treatment of Hepatitis C. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2015, 16, 4985-4996.

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