Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2012, 13(2), 1778-1789; doi:10.3390/ijms13021778
Article

Cinnamic Acid and Its Derivatives Inhibit Fructose-Mediated Protein Glycation

1 The Medical Food Research and Development Center, Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand 2 Research Group of Herbal Medicine for Prevention and Therapeutic of Metabolic diseases, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand 3 Program in Clinical Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand 4 Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand
* Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 13 January 2012; in revised form: 22 January 2012 / Accepted: 31 January 2012 / Published: 8 February 2012
(This article belongs to the Section Bioactives and Nutraceuticals)
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Abstract: Cinnamic acid and its derivatives have shown a variety of pharmacologic properties. However, little is known about the antiglycation properties of cinnamic acid and its derivatives. The present study sought to characterize the protein glycation inhibitory activity of cinnamic acid and its derivatives in a bovine serum albumin (BSA)/fructose system. The results demonstrated that cinnamic acid and its derivatives significantly inhibited the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) by approximately 11.96–63.36% at a concentration of 1 mM. The strongest inhibitory activity against the formation of AGEs was shown by cinnamic acid. Furthermore, cinnamic acid and its derivatives reduced the level of fructosamine, the formation of Nε-(carboxymethyl) lysine (CML), and the level of amyloid cross β-structure. Cinnamic acid and its derivatives also prevented oxidative protein damages, including effects on protein carbonyl formation and thiol oxidation of BSA. Our findings may lead to the possibility of using cinnamic acid and its derivatives for preventing AGE-mediated diabetic complications.
Keywords: cinnamic acid; glycation; advanced glycation end products; diabetic complications; fructose

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MDPI and ACS Style

Adisakwattana, S.; Sompong, W.; Meeprom, A.; Ngamukote, S.; Yibchok-anun, S. Cinnamic Acid and Its Derivatives Inhibit Fructose-Mediated Protein Glycation. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2012, 13, 1778-1789.

AMA Style

Adisakwattana S, Sompong W, Meeprom A, Ngamukote S, Yibchok-anun S. Cinnamic Acid and Its Derivatives Inhibit Fructose-Mediated Protein Glycation. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2012; 13(2):1778-1789.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Adisakwattana, Sirichai; Sompong, Weerachat; Meeprom, Aramsri; Ngamukote, Sathaporn; Yibchok-anun, Sirintorn. 2012. "Cinnamic Acid and Its Derivatives Inhibit Fructose-Mediated Protein Glycation." Int. J. Mol. Sci. 13, no. 2: 1778-1789.

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