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Molecules 2018, 23(1), 231; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23010231

Brassicaceae Mustards: Traditional and Agronomic Uses in Australia and New Zealand

Southern Cross Plant Science, Southern Cross University, Lismore, NSW-2480, Australia
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Received: 20 November 2017 / Revised: 4 January 2018 / Accepted: 18 January 2018 / Published: 21 January 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Products Research in Australia and New Zealand)
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Abstract

Commonly cultivated Brassicaceae mustards, namely garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata), white mustard (Brassica alba), Ethiopian mustard (B. carinata), Asian mustard (B. juncea), oilseed rape (B. napus), black mustard (B. nigra), rapeseed (B. rapa), white ball mustard (Calepina irregularis), ball mustard (Neslia paniculata), treacle mustard (Erysimum repandum), hedge mustard (Sisymbrium officinale), Asian hedge mustard (S. orientale), smooth mustard (S. erysimoides) and canola are the major economically important oilseed crops in many countries. Mustards were naturalized to Australia and New Zealand and Australia is currently the second largest exporter of Brassicaceae oilseeds to meet the global demand for a healthy plant-derived oil, high in polyunsaturated fats. Apart from providing edible oil, various parts of these plants and many of their phytochemicals have been used traditionally for both agronomic as well as medicinal purposes, with evidence of their use by early Australian and New Zealand settlers and also the indigenous population. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of traditional and agronomic uses of Brassicaceae oilseeds and mustards with a focus on their importance in Australia and New Zealand. View Full-Text
Keywords: Brassicaceae oilseeds; bioactive constituents; canola; mustard; glucosinolates; agronomic importance; Australia and New Zealand traditional medicine Brassicaceae oilseeds; bioactive constituents; canola; mustard; glucosinolates; agronomic importance; Australia and New Zealand traditional medicine
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Rahman, M.; Khatun, A.; Liu, L.; Barkla, B.J. Brassicaceae Mustards: Traditional and Agronomic Uses in Australia and New Zealand. Molecules 2018, 23, 231.

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