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Molecules 2016, 21(12), 1610; doi:10.3390/molecules21121610

Emerging Phytochemicals for the Prevention and Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer

1
Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35216, USA
2
Nutrition and Obesity Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35216, USA
3
Birmingham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Birmingham, AL 35233, USA
Academic Editor: Derek J. McPhee
Received: 14 October 2016 / Revised: 18 November 2016 / Accepted: 20 November 2016 / Published: 24 November 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cancer Chemoprevention)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [787 KB, uploaded 24 November 2016]   |  

Abstract

Despite the development of more advanced medical therapies, cancer management remains a problem. Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a particularly challenging malignancy and requires more effective treatment strategies and a reduction in the debilitating morbidities associated with the therapies. Phytochemicals have long been used in ancient systems of medicine, and non-toxic phytochemicals are being considered as new options for the effective management of cancer. Here, we discuss the growth inhibitory and anti-cell migratory actions of proanthocyanidins from grape seeds (GSPs), polyphenols in green tea and honokiol, derived from the Magnolia species. Studies of these phytochemicals using human HNSCC cell lines from different sub-sites have demonstrated significant protective effects against HNSCC in both in vitro and in vivo models. Treatment of human HNSCC cell lines with GSPs, (−)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a polyphenolic component of green tea or honokiol reduced cell viability and induced apoptosis. These effects have been associated with inhibitory effects of the phytochemicals on the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and cell cycle regulatory proteins, as well as other major tumor-associated pathways. Similarly, the cell migration capacity of HNSCC cell lines was inhibited. Thus, GSPs, honokiol and EGCG appear to be promising bioactive phytochemicals for the management of head and neck cancer. View Full-Text
Keywords: head and neck cancer; epidermal growth factor receptor; phytochemical; cell migration; tumor growth head and neck cancer; epidermal growth factor receptor; phytochemical; cell migration; tumor growth
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Katiyar, S.K. Emerging Phytochemicals for the Prevention and Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer. Molecules 2016, 21, 1610.

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