Next Article in Journal
Synthesis, Characterization and Reactions of (Azidoethynyl)trimethylsilane
Previous Article in Journal
Oligonucleotide Functionalised Microbeads: Indispensable Tools for High-Throughput Aptamer Selection
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Molecules 2015, 20(12), 21313-21327; doi:10.3390/molecules201219768

Evaluation of Antimicrobial Efficiency of New Polymers Comprised by Covalently Attached and/or Electrostatically Bound Bacteriostatic Species, Based on Quaternary Ammonium Compounds

1
Environmental Microbiology, Department of Public Health, Medical School, University of Patras, 26504 Patras, Greece
2
Department of Chemistry, University of Patras, 26504 Patras, Greece
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Derek J. McPhee
Received: 2 October 2015 / Revised: 22 November 2015 / Accepted: 24 November 2015 / Published: 1 December 2015
(This article belongs to the Section Medicinal Chemistry)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [2704 KB, uploaded 4 December 2015]   |  

Abstract

In the present work a detailed study of new bacteriostatic copolymers with quaternized ammonium groups introduced in the polymer chain through covalent attachment or electrostatic interaction, was performed. Different copolymers have been considered since beside the active species, the hydrophobic/hydrophilic nature of the co-monomer was also evaluated in the case of covalently attached bacteriostatic groups, aiming at achieving permanent antibacterial activity. Homopolymers with quaternized ammonium/phosphonium groups were also tested for comparison reasons. The antimicrobial activity of the synthesized polymers after 3 and 24 h of exposure at 4 and 22 °C was investigated on cultures of Gram-negative (P. aeruginosa, E. coli) and Gram-positive (S. aureus, E. faecalis) bacteria. It was found that the combination of the hydrophilic monomer acrylic acid (AA), at low contents, with the covalently attached bacteriostatic group vinyl benzyl dimethylhexadecylammonium chloride (VBCHAM) in the copolymer P(AA-co-VBCHAM88), resulted in a high bacteriostatic activity against P. aeruginosa and E. faecalis (6 log reduction in certain cases). Moreover, the combination of covalently attached VBCHAM units with electrostatically bound cetyltrimethylammonium 4-styrene sulfonate (SSAmC16) units in the P(SSAmC16-co-VBCHAMx) copolymers led to efficient antimicrobial materials, especially against Gram-positive bacteria, where a log reduction between 4.9 and 6.2 was verified. These materials remain remarkably efficient even when they are incorporated in polysulfone membranes. View Full-Text
Keywords: antimicrobial activity; polymers; quaternary ammonium units; covalent attachment; electrostatic binding; bacteria; survival antimicrobial activity; polymers; quaternary ammonium units; covalent attachment; electrostatic binding; bacteria; survival
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Kougia, E.; Tselepi, M.; Vasilopoulos, G.; Lainioti, G.C.; Koromilas, N.D.; Druvari, D.; Bokias, G.; Vantarakis, A.; Kallitsis, J.K. Evaluation of Antimicrobial Efficiency of New Polymers Comprised by Covalently Attached and/or Electrostatically Bound Bacteriostatic Species, Based on Quaternary Ammonium Compounds. Molecules 2015, 20, 21313-21327.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]

Molecules EISSN 1420-3049 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top