Next Article in Journal
Analysis of Biotinylated Generation 4 Poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) Dendrimer Distribution in the Rat Brain and Toxicity in a Cellular Model of the Blood-Brain Barrier
Previous Article in Journal
Click Reactions as a Key Step for an Efficient and Selective Synthesis of D-Xylose-Based ILs
Molecules 2013, 18(9), 11526-11536; doi:10.3390/molecules180911526
Article

Effect of Tomato Industrial Processing on Phenolic Profile and Antiplatelet Activity

1,2
, 3
, 4
, 3
, 3
, 1,2
 and 1,2,*
Received: 8 August 2013; in revised form: 12 September 2013 / Accepted: 12 September 2013 / Published: 17 September 2013
Download PDF [915 KB, uploaded 18 June 2014]
Abstract: Background: Regular consumption of fruits and vegetables (e.g., tomatoes) has been shown to be beneficial in terms of reducing the incidence of cardiovascular diseases. The industrial processing of tomatoes into tomato-based products includes several thermal treatments. Very little is known on the effect of tomato industrial processing on antiaggregatory activity and phenolic profile. Methods: It was assessed the effect of tomato and by-products extracts on platelet aggregation induced by ADP, collagen, TRAP-6 and arachidonic acid. These in vitro antithrombotic properties were further supported in an in vivo model of thrombosis. A set of antiplatelet compounds has been selected for HPLC analysis in the different extracts. Results: Some natural compounds such as chlorogenic, caffeic, ferulic and p-coumaric acids were identified by HPLC in tomatoes and its products may inhibit platelet activation. Red tomatoes, tomato products (sauce, ketchup and juice) and by-products extracts inhibited platelet aggregation induced adenosine 5'-diphosphate, collagen, thrombin receptor activator peptide-6 and arachidonic acid, but to a different extent. Also, pomace extract presents antithrombotic activity. Conclusions: Processed tomatoes may have a higher content of health-benefiting compounds than fresh ones. Pomace even presents the best antiplatelet activity. Finally, tomato products may be used as a functional ingredient adding antiplatelet activities to processed foods.
Keywords: tomato; tomato products; antiplatelet activity; phenolic compounds; nutrition tomato; tomato products; antiplatelet activity; phenolic compounds; nutrition
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Export to BibTeX |
EndNote


MDPI and ACS Style

Fuentes, E.; Forero-Doria, O.; Carrasco, G.; Maricán, A.; Santos, L.S.; Alarcón, M.; Palomo, I. Effect of Tomato Industrial Processing on Phenolic Profile and Antiplatelet Activity. Molecules 2013, 18, 11526-11536.

AMA Style

Fuentes E, Forero-Doria O, Carrasco G, Maricán A, Santos LS, Alarcón M, Palomo I. Effect of Tomato Industrial Processing on Phenolic Profile and Antiplatelet Activity. Molecules. 2013; 18(9):11526-11536.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Fuentes, Eduardo; Forero-Doria, Oscar; Carrasco, Gilda; Maricán, Adolfo; Santos, Leonardo S.; Alarcón, Marcelo; Palomo, Iván. 2013. "Effect of Tomato Industrial Processing on Phenolic Profile and Antiplatelet Activity." Molecules 18, no. 9: 11526-11536.


Molecules EISSN 1420-3049 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert