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Multimodal Technologies Interact., Volume 1, Issue 1 (March 2017)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial Welcome to MTI—A New Open Access Journal Dealing with Blue Sky Research and Future Trends in Multimodal Technologies and Interaction
Multimodal Technologies Interact. 2017, 1(1), 1; doi:10.3390/mti1010001
Received: 12 April 2016 / Accepted: 13 April 2016 / Published: 20 April 2016
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Abstract In this era of massive use of computers and other computational devices (e.g., low-cost wearable sensors, smartphones, other smart devices, etc.), the nature of digital data is becoming more complex and heterogeneous. Full article

Review

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Open AccessReview Familiar and Strange: Gender, Sex, and Love in the Uncanny Valley
Multimodal Technologies Interact. 2017, 1(1), 2; doi:10.3390/mti1010002
Received: 30 September 2016 / Revised: 19 December 2016 / Accepted: 21 December 2016 / Published: 4 January 2017
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Abstract
Early robotics research held that increased realism should result in increased positivity of the interactions between people and humanoid robots. However, this turned out to be true only to a certain point, and researchers now recognize that human interactions with highly realistic humanoid
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Early robotics research held that increased realism should result in increased positivity of the interactions between people and humanoid robots. However, this turned out to be true only to a certain point, and researchers now recognize that human interactions with highly realistic humanoid robots are often marked by feelings of disgust, fear, anxiety, and distrust. This phenomenon is called the Uncanny Valley. In a world in which Artificial Companions are increasingly likely, and even desired, engineering humanoid robots that avoid the Uncanny Valley is of critical importance. This paper examines theories of the uncanny, and focuses on one in particular—that humans subconsciously appraise robots as potential sexual partners. Drawing from work on love, sexuality, and gender from a variety of fields, this paper speculates on possible futures in a world of intimate companionships between humans and machines. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Love and Sex with Robots)
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