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J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2017, 2(3), 29; doi:10.3390/jfmk2030029

Do Muscle Strength Imbalances and Low Flexibility Levels Lead to Low Back Pain? A Brief Review

1
Centre for Exercise and Sports Science Research (CESSR), School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, WA 6027, Australia
2
School of Physical Education, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre 90690-200, Brazil
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 15 July 2017 / Revised: 31 July 2017 / Accepted: 3 August 2017 / Published: 4 August 2017
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Abstract

Chronic low back pain (CLBP) has been related to hips, trunk and spine strength imbalances and/or low flexibility levels. However, it is not clear if the assessment and normalization of these variables are effective for prevention of low back pain (LBP) episodes and rehabilitation of patients with CLBP. This brief review explored studies that have associated hip, trunk and spine strength imbalances and/or low flexibility levels to LBP episodes or CLBP condition. Fourteen studies were selected by accessing PubMed and Google Scholar databases. Collectively, the selected studies demonstrate that trunk eccentric/concentric and flexion/extension strength imbalances may be associated with CLBP or LBP episodes. However, the literature fails to demonstrate any clear relationship between hip strength imbalances or low levels of spine flexibility with CLBP or LBP episodes. In addition, there is no direct evidence to support the idea that the normalization of these variables due to resistance and flexibility training leads to pain reduction and functionality improvements in subjects with CLBP. Although further investigation is needed, the lack of a clear direct association between hip strength imbalances or spine low flexibility levels to CLBP or LBP episodes may demonstrate that these variables may have very low effect within the complexity of these conditions. View Full-Text
Keywords: chronic low back pain; low back pain episodes; strength ratios; side-to-side asymmetry; flexibility levels chronic low back pain; low back pain episodes; strength ratios; side-to-side asymmetry; flexibility levels
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Victora Ruas, C.; Vieira, A. Do Muscle Strength Imbalances and Low Flexibility Levels Lead to Low Back Pain? A Brief Review. J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2017, 2, 29.

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J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. EISSN 2411-5142 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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