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Horticulturae 2017, 3(1), 25; doi:10.3390/horticulturae3010025

Nitrogen Related Diffuse Pollution from Horticulture Production—Mitigation Practices and Assessment Strategies

1
Department of Biosystems Engineering, Instituto Superior de Agronomia, University of Lisbon, Tapada da Ajuda, 1349-017 Lisboa, Portugal
2
Linking Landscape, Environment, Agriculture and Food (LEAF), Instituto Superior de Agronomia, University of Lisbon, Tapada da Ajuda, 1349-017 Lisboa, Portugal
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Douglas D. Archbold
Received: 24 October 2016 / Revised: 13 February 2017 / Accepted: 22 February 2017 / Published: 28 February 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Refining Irrigation Strategies in Horticultural Production)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [831 KB, uploaded 28 February 2017]   |  

Abstract

Agriculture is considered one of the main nitrogen (N) pollution sources through the diffuse emissions of ammonia (NH3) and nitrous oxide (N2O) to the atmosphere and nitrate (NO3) to water bodies. The risk is particularly high in horticultural production systems (HPS), where the use of water and fertilizers is intensive and concentrated in space and time, and more specifically, in the case of vegetable crops that have high growth rates, demanding an abundant supply of water and nitrogen forms. Therefore, to comply with the EU environmental policies aimed at reducing diffuse pollution in agriculture, there is the need for mitigation practices or strategies acting at different levels such as the source, the timing and the transport of N. HPS are often well suited for improvement practices, but efficient and specific tools capable of describing and quantifying N losses for these particular production systems are required. The most common mitigation strategies found in the literature relate to crop, irrigation and fertilization management. Nevertheless, only the success of a mitigation strategy under specific conditions will allow its implementation to be increasingly targeted and more cost effective. Assessment methods are therefore required to evaluate and to quantify the impact of mitigation strategies in HPS and to select the most promising ones. View Full-Text
Keywords: horticulture; diffuse pollution; N emissions; N leaching; mitigation strategies; fertigation management; crop management horticulture; diffuse pollution; N emissions; N leaching; mitigation strategies; fertigation management; crop management
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Cameira, M.R.; Mota, M. Nitrogen Related Diffuse Pollution from Horticulture Production—Mitigation Practices and Assessment Strategies. Horticulturae 2017, 3, 25.

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