Next Article in Journal
Risk Factors of Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase Producing Enterobacteriaceae Occurrence in Farms in Reunion, Madagascar and Mayotte Islands, 2016–2017
Previous Article in Journal
“I Always Feel Like I Have to Rush…” Pet Owner and Small Animal Veterinary Surgeons’ Reflections on Time during Preventative Healthcare Consultations in the United Kingdom
Article Menu
Issue 1 (March) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Vet. Sci. 2018, 5(1), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci5010021

Stability of Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus on Fomite Materials at Different Temperatures

Department of Veterinary Population Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, 225 VMC, 1365 Gortner Ave, St. Paul, MN 55108, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 10 January 2018 / Revised: 9 February 2018 / Accepted: 11 February 2018 / Published: 13 February 2018
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1599 KB, uploaded 13 February 2018]   |  

Abstract

Indirect transmission of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) ensues when susceptible animals contact PEDV-contaminated fomite materials. Although the survival of PEDV under various pHs and temperatures has been studied, virus stability on different fomite surfaces under varying temperature conditions has not been explored. Hence, we evaluated the survival of PEDV on inanimate objects routinely used on swine farms such as styrofoam, rubber, plastic, coveralls, and other equipment. The titer of infectious PEDV at 4 °C decreased by only 1 to 2 log during the first 5 days, and the virus was recoverable for up to 15 days on Styrofoam, aluminum, Tyvek® coverall, cloth, and plastic. However, viral titers decreased precipitously when stored at room temperature; no virus was detectable after one day on all materials tested. A more sensitive immunoplaque assay was able to detect virus from Styrofoam, metal, and plastic at 20 days post application, representing a 3-log loss of input virus on fomite materials. Recovery of infectious PEDV from Tyvek® coverall and rubber was above detection limit at 20 days. Our findings indicate that the type of fomite material and temperatures impact PEDV stability, which is important in understanding the nuances of indirect transmission and epidemiology of PEDV. View Full-Text
Keywords: porcine epidemic diarrhea virus; fomite; stability; material; temperature; survival; swine; rubber; plastic; Styrofoam porcine epidemic diarrhea virus; fomite; stability; material; temperature; survival; swine; rubber; plastic; Styrofoam
Figures

Graphical abstract

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Kim, Y.; Krishna, V.D.; Torremorell, M.; Goyal, S.M.; Cheeran, M.C.-J. Stability of Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus on Fomite Materials at Different Temperatures. Vet. Sci. 2018, 5, 21.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Vet. Sci. EISSN 2306-7381 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top