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Medicines 2016, 3(2), 15; doi:10.3390/medicines3020015

Metabolic Syndrome and Framingham Risk Score: Observation from Screening of Low-Income Semi-Urban African Women

1
Department of Medicine, Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital, Ado Ekiti 36001, Ekiti State, Nigeria
2
Department of Medical Laboratory Science, Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital, Ado Ekiti 36001, Ekiti State, Nigeria
3
Department of Surgery, Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital, Ado Ekiti 36001, Ekiti State, Nigeria
4
Department of Community Medicine, Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital, Ado Ekiti 36001, Ekiti State, Nigeria
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Ryuichi Morishita
Received: 8 May 2016 / Revised: 25 May 2016 / Accepted: 1 June 2016 / Published: 9 June 2016
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Abstract

Background: The heightened cardiovascular risk associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS) has been documented by several researchers. The Framingham risk score (FRS) provides a simple and efficient method for identifying individuals at cardiovascular risk. The objective was to describe the prevalence of MetS and its association with FRS in predicting cardiovascular disease among a cohort of semi-urban women; Method: Clinical and laboratory parameters were evaluated among 189 healthy women. The International Diabetes Federation definition was used to diagnose metabolic syndrome. FRS was calculated for each participant; Result: About two thirds of the participant make less than $US 90 per month. The mean systolic blood pressure was 131.80 ± 30. Eighty (42.3%) participants were overweight with a mean waist circumference of 91.64 ± 11.19 cm. MetS was present in 46 (24.3%). Individuals with MetS were more likely to have increased FRS, p = 0.012. One hundred and eighty seven (98.9%) were in the low risk category according to FRS. There was a significant difference in the mean FRS between participants with and without MetS (13.52 versus 10.29 p = 0.025); Conclusion: Prevalence of MetS in this study was comparable to the global rate, despite a low economic status. Individuals with MetS were more likely to have cardiovascular disease than persons without MetS, thus emphasizing the need for risk stratification and prompt management. View Full-Text
Keywords: metabolic syndrome; Framingham risk score; cardiovascular disease metabolic syndrome; Framingham risk score; cardiovascular disease
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Dada, A.S.; Ajayi, D.D.; Areo, P.O.; Raimi, T.H.; Emmanuel, E.E.; Odu, O.O.; Aremu, O.A. Metabolic Syndrome and Framingham Risk Score: Observation from Screening of Low-Income Semi-Urban African Women. Medicines 2016, 3, 15.

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