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Foods 2015, 4(1), 3-14; doi:10.3390/foods4010003

Neem (Azadirachta indica A. Juss) Oil: A Natural Preservative to Control Meat Spoilage

1
Agricultural Research Council (CRA), Research Center of Animal Production (CRA-PCM), Via Salaria 31, Monterotondo, RM 00015, Italy
2
Department of Environmental Biology, University of Rome Sapienza, Piazzale Aldo Moro 5, Rome 00161, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: John Marchello
Received: 21 August 2014 / Accepted: 9 December 2014 / Published: 9 January 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbiology Safety of Meat Products)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [328 KB, uploaded 9 January 2015]   |  

Abstract

Plant-derived extracts (PDEs) are a source of biologically-active substances having antimicrobial properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of neem oil (NO) as a preservative of fresh retail meat. The antibacterial activity of NO against Carnobacterium maltaromaticum, Brochothrix thermosphacta, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Lactobacillus curvatus and L. sakei was assessed in a broth model system. The bacterial growth inhibition zone (mm) ranged from 18.83 ± 1.18 to 30.00 ± 1.00, as was found by a disc diffusion test with 100 µL NO. The bacterial percent growth reduction ranged from 30.81 ± 2.08 to 99.70 ± 1.53 in the broth microdilution method at different NO concentrations (1:10 to 1:100,000). Viable bacterial cells were detected in experimentally-contaminated meat up to the second day after NO treatment (100 µL NO per 10 g meat), except for C. maltaromaticum, which was detected up to the sixth day by PCR and nested PCR with propidium monoazide (PMA™) dye. In comparison to the previously published results, C. maltaromaticum, E. coli, L. curvatus and L. sakei appeared more susceptible to NO compared to neem cake extract (NCE) by using a broth model system. View Full-Text
Keywords: neem oil; Azadirachta indica; meat spoilage control; antibacterial activity; HPTLC neem oil; Azadirachta indica; meat spoilage control; antibacterial activity; HPTLC
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Del Serrone, P.; Toniolo, C.; Nicoletti, M. Neem (Azadirachta indica A. Juss) Oil: A Natural Preservative to Control Meat Spoilage. Foods 2015, 4, 3-14.

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