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Retraction: Adyel et al. Health Risk Assessment of Pesticide Residues via Dietary Intake of Market Vegetables from Dhaka, Bangladesh. Foods 2013, 2, 64–75
Foods 2013, 2(3), 352-363; doi:10.3390/foods2030352
Article

Influence of Heat Treatments on Carotenoid Content of Cherry Tomatoes

* ,
 and
CRA-NUT, Agricultural Research Council-Center for Food and Nutrition, Via Ardeatina 546, Rome 00178, Italy
* Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 29 May 2013 / Revised: 18 June 2013 / Accepted: 18 July 2013 / Published: 31 July 2013
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Abstract

Tomatoes and tomato products are rich sources of carotenoids—principally lycopene, followed by β-carotene and lutein. The aim of this work was to study the effect of heat treatment on carotenoid content in cherry tomatoes. Raw and canned products were sampled and analysed; furthermore whole, skin and pulp fractions of cherry tomatoes were analysed when raw and home-processed, in order to better understand heat treatment effects. Lycopene content in canned tomatoes was two-fold higher than in raw tomatoes (11.60 mg/100 g versus 5.12 mg/100 g). Lutein and β-carotene were respectively 0.15 mg/100 g and 0.75 mg/100 g in canned tomatoes versus 0.11 mg/100 g and 1.00 mg/100 g in raw tomatoes. For home-processed tomatoes, β-carotene and lutein showed a content decrease in all thermally treated products. This decrease was more evident for β-carotene in the skin fraction (−17%), while for lutein it was greater in the pulp fraction (−25%). Lycopene presented a different pattern: after heat treatment its concentration increased both in the whole and in pulp fractions, while in the skin fraction it decreased dramatically (−36%). The analysis of the isomers formed during the thermal treatment suggests that lycopene is rather stable inside the tomato matrix.
Keywords: lycopene; home-processed; thermal treatments; geometric isomers lycopene; home-processed; thermal treatments; geometric isomers
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 3.0).

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D'Evoli, L.; Lombardi-Boccia, G.; Lucarini, M. Influence of Heat Treatments on Carotenoid Content of Cherry Tomatoes. Foods 2013, 2, 352-363.

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