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Children 2017, 4(6), 44; doi:10.3390/children4060044

Effect of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Treatment on Lipids in Obese Children

1
Department of Endocrinology, Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, ON K1H 8L1, Canada
2
Division of Sleep Medicine; Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
3
Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics; Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
4
Division of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Paul R. Carney and James D. Geyer
Received: 21 March 2017 / Revised: 21 March 2017 / Accepted: 27 March 2017 / Published: 1 June 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sleep Medicine in Children and Adolescents)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [214 KB, uploaded 1 June 2017]

Abstract

Obesity in children is associated with several co-morbidities including dyslipidemia. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is commonly seen in obese children. In adults, diagnosis of OSA independent of obesity is associated with cardiometabolic risk factors including dyslipidemia. There is limited data on the impact of treatment of OSA on lipids in children. The objective of the study was to examine the impact of treatment of OSA on lipids in 24 obese children. Methods: Seventeen children were treated with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and five underwent adenotonsillectomy. Mean apnea hypopnea index prior to treatment was 13.0 + 12.1 and mean body mass index (BMI) was 38.0 + 10.6 kg/m2. Results: Treatment of OSA was associated with improvement in total cholesterol (mean change = −11 mg/dL, p < 0.001), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (mean change = –8.8 mg/dL, p = 0.021). Conclusion: Obese children should be routinely screened for OSA, as treatment of OSA favorably influences lipids and therefore decreases their cardiovascular risk. View Full-Text
Keywords: obstructive sleep apnea; childhood obesity; dyslipidemia; cholesterol; continuous positive airway pressure obstructive sleep apnea; childhood obesity; dyslipidemia; cholesterol; continuous positive airway pressure
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Amini, Z.; Kotagal, S.; Lohse, C.; Lloyd, R.; Sriram, S.; Kumar, S. Effect of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Treatment on Lipids in Obese Children. Children 2017, 4, 44.

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