Next Article in Journal
Links between Autism Spectrum Disorder Diagnostic Status and Family Quality of Life
Next Article in Special Issue
Mind–Body Interventions for Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease
Previous Article in Journal / Special Issue
Incorporating Hypnosis into Pediatric Clinical Encounters
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessReview
Children 2017, 4(4), 19; doi:10.3390/children4040019

Clinical Hypnosis, an Effective Mind–Body Modality for Adolescents with Behavioral and Physical Complaints

1
Department of Pediatrics, Hurley Children’s Hospital/Hurley Medical Center, Michigan State University College of Human Medicine, Flint, MI 48503, USA
2
Department of Pediatrics, Adolescent Medicine Division and Department of Orthopedics and Sports Medicine, Seattle Children’s Hospital, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98105, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Hilary McClafferty
Received: 2 February 2017 / Revised: 7 March 2017 / Accepted: 20 March 2017 / Published: 24 March 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mind-Body Medicine in Children and Adolescents)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [229 KB, uploaded 24 March 2017]

Abstract

Mind–body medicine is a system of health practices that includes meditation/relaxation training, guided imagery, hypnosis, biofeedback, yoga, art/music therapy, prayer, t’ai chi, and psychological therapies such as cognitive behavioral therapy. Clinical hypnosis is an important mind–body tool that serves as an adjunct to conventional medical care for the adolescent patient. Clinical hypnosis specifically uses self-directed therapeutic suggestions to cultivate the imagination and facilitate the mind–body connection, leading to positive emotional and physical well-being. There are many similarities between clinical hypnosis and other mind–body/self-regulatory modalities such as visual imagery, mindfulness meditation, yoga, and biofeedback that incorporate experiential learning and mechanisms for change. They may be viewed as subtypes of the hypnotic experience and share the common experience of trance as the entrée into self-empowered change in physiologic and psychological states. Clinical hypnosis can be used by health care providers to teach adolescents coping skills to deal with a wide variety of conditions such as chronic headaches, recurrent abdominal pain, anxiety, depression, grief and bereavement, phobias, anger, family stressors, sleep disorders, or enuresis. Clinical vignettes are given to help illustrate the effectiveness of hypnosis in adolescents. View Full-Text
Keywords: mind–body therapies; adolescents; pain; headache; stress; anxiety; depression; hypnosis; guided imagery; mindfulness; emotional regulation mind–body therapies; adolescents; pain; headache; stress; anxiety; depression; hypnosis; guided imagery; mindfulness; emotional regulation
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Sawni, A.; Breuner, C.C. Clinical Hypnosis, an Effective Mind–Body Modality for Adolescents with Behavioral and Physical Complaints. Children 2017, 4, 19.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Children EISSN 2227-9067 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top