Next Article in Journal
Neighborhood Safety and Major Depressive Disorder in a National Sample of Black Youth; Gender by Ethnic Differences
Next Article in Special Issue
The Role of Mindfulness in Reducing the Adverse Effects of Childhood Stress and Trauma
Previous Article in Journal / Special Issue
Medical Yoga Therapy
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Children 2017, 4(2), 13; doi:10.3390/children4020013

Do Mothers Benefit from a Child-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Treatment (CBT) for Childhood Functional Abdominal Pain? A Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial

1
Counseling Psychology, University of Potsdam, Potsdam 14469, Germany
2
Deutsche Morbus Crohn/Colitis ulcerosa Vereinigung (DCCV e.V.), Berlin 10179, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Hilary McClafferty
Received: 13 December 2016 / Revised: 3 February 2017 / Accepted: 6 February 2017 / Published: 15 February 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mind-Body Medicine in Children and Adolescents)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [735 KB, uploaded 16 February 2017]   |  

Abstract

While the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) approaches for childhood functional abdominal pain (FAP) is well-established for child outcomes, only a few studies have reported on parent-specific outcomes. This randomized controlled pilot trial analyzed effects of a group CBT on maternal variables (i.e., pain-related behavior, worries and self-efficacy, as well as general psychosocial strain). Methods: The sample constituted of 15 mothers in the intervention group (IG) and 14 mothers in the waitlist control group (WLC). Outcome measures were assessed pre-treatment, post-treatment and at three months follow-up. Results: Analyses revealed significant, large changes in maladaptive maternal reactions related to the child’s abdominal pain in the IG compared to the WLC—i.e., reduced attention (d = 0.95), medical help-seeking (d = 0.92), worries (d = 1.03), as well as a significant increase in behaviors that encourage the child’s self-management (d = 1.03). In addition, maternal self-efficacy in dealing with a child’s pain significantly increased in the IG as well (d = 0.92). Treatment effects emerged post-treatment and could be maintained until three months follow-up. There were no effects on general self-efficacy and maternal quality of life. Conclusion: While these results are promising, and underline the efficacy of the CBT approach for both the child and mothers, further studies, including long-term follow-ups, are warranted. View Full-Text
Keywords: functional abdominal pain; parents; CBT; behavior; self-efficacy; RCT; waitlist control functional abdominal pain; parents; CBT; behavior; self-efficacy; RCT; waitlist control
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Supplementary material

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Calvano, C.; Groß, M.; Warschburger, P. Do Mothers Benefit from a Child-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Treatment (CBT) for Childhood Functional Abdominal Pain? A Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial. Children 2017, 4, 13.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Children EISSN 2227-9067 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top