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Healthcare 2018, 6(2), 53; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare6020053

Chronicity and Mental Health Service Utilization for Anxiety, Mood, and Substance Use Disorders among Black Men in the United States; Ethnicity and Nativity Differences

1
Departments of Psychology and Health Policy and Management, University of California, Los Angeles Fielding School of Public Health, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
2
UCLA Center for Bridging Research Innovation, Training and Education for Minority Health Disparities Solutions, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
3
Informatics, Decision-Enhancement and Analytic Sciences Center (IDEAS 2.0), Veteran Affairs Salt Lake City Health Care System, Salt Lake City, UT 84148, USA
4
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT 84132, USA
5
Departments of Epidemiology and Statistics, University of California, Los Angele Fielding School of Public Health, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
6
School of Social Work, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
7
Program for Research on Black Americans, Institute of Social Research, Ann Arbor, MI 48106, USA
8
Department of Psychology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 26 January 2018 / Revised: 14 May 2018 / Accepted: 14 May 2018 / Published: 23 May 2018
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Abstract

This study investigated ethnic and nativity differences in the chronicity and treatment of psychiatric disorders of African American and Caribbean Black men in the U.S. Data were analyzed from the National Survey of American Life, a population-based study which included 1859 self-identified Black men (1222 African American, 176 Caribbean Black men born within the U.S., and 461 Caribbean Black men born outside the U.S.). Lifetime and twelve-month prevalence of DSM-IV mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders (including Bipolar I and Dysthmia), disorder chronicity, and rate of mental health services use among those meeting criteria for a lifetime psychiatric disorder were examined. Logistic regression models were employed to determine ethnic differences in chronicity, and treatment utilization for disorders. While rates of DSM-IV disorders were generally low in this community sample of Black men, their disorders were chronic and remained untreated. Caribbean Black men born in the U.S. had higher prevalence of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Major Depressive Disorder, and Alcohol Abuse Disorder compared with African American men. Foreign born Caribbean Black men experienced greater chronicity in Social Phobia and Generalized Anxiety Disorder compared to other Black Men. Utilization of mental health service was low for all groups of Black Men, but lowest for the foreign born Caribbean Black men. Results underscore the large unmet needs of both African American and Caribbean Black men in the United States. Results also highlight the role of ethnicity and nativity in mental disorder chronicity and mental health service utilization patterns of Black men. View Full-Text
Keywords: psychiatric disorders; anxiety; mood; depression; substance use disorders; blacks; gender; ethnicity; nativity; Bipolar I and II; Dysthmia psychiatric disorders; anxiety; mood; depression; substance use disorders; blacks; gender; ethnicity; nativity; Bipolar I and II; Dysthmia
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Mays, V.M.; Jones, A.L.; Cochran, S.D.; Taylor, R.J.; Rafferty, J.; Jackson, J.S. Chronicity and Mental Health Service Utilization for Anxiety, Mood, and Substance Use Disorders among Black Men in the United States; Ethnicity and Nativity Differences. Healthcare 2018, 6, 53.

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