Next Article in Journal
On the Rate of Synthesis of Individual Proteins within and between Different Striated Muscles of the Rat
Previous Article in Journal
Comparing Simplification Strategies for the Skeletal Muscle Proteome
Previous Article in Special Issue
A Staphylococcus aureus Proteome Overview: Shared and Specific Proteins and Protein Complexes from Representative Strains of All Three Clades
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessReview
Proteomes 2016, 4(1), 11; doi:10.3390/proteomes4010011

Omics Approaches for the Study of Adaptive Immunity to Staphylococcus aureus and the Selection of Vaccine Candidates

1
Department of Immunology, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald 17475, Germany
2
Department of Medical Microbiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht 3584, The Netherlands
3
ZIK-FunGene Junior Research Group Applied Proteomics, Department of Functional Genomics, Interfaculty Institute for Genetics and Functional Genomics, EMA-University of Greifswald, Greifswald 17475, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Michael Hecker, Katharina Riedel and Jacek R. Wisniewski
Received: 3 November 2015 / Revised: 5 February 2016 / Accepted: 1 March 2016 / Published: 7 March 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbial Proteomics)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [986 KB, uploaded 7 March 2016]   |  

Abstract

Staphylococcus aureus is a dangerous pathogen both in hospitals and in the community. Due to the crisis of antibiotic resistance, there is an urgent need for new strategies to combat S. aureus infections, such as vaccination. Increasing our knowledge about the mechanisms of protection will be key for the successful prevention or treatment of S. aureus invasion. Omics technologies generate a comprehensive picture of the physiological and pathophysiological processes within cells, tissues, organs, organisms and even populations. This review provides an overview of the contribution of genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics and immunoproteomics to the current understanding of S. aureus‑host interaction, with a focus on the adaptive immune response to the microorganism. While antibody responses during colonization and infection have been analyzed in detail using immunoproteomics, the full potential of omics technologies has not been tapped yet in terms of T-cells. Omics technologies promise to speed up vaccine development by enabling reverse vaccinology approaches. In consequence, omics technologies are powerful tools for deepening our understanding of the “superbug” S. aureus and for improving its control. View Full-Text
Keywords: Staphylococcus aureus; vaccine; immune response; adaptive immunity; genomics; proteomics; transcriptomics; immunoproteomics Staphylococcus aureus; vaccine; immune response; adaptive immunity; genomics; proteomics; transcriptomics; immunoproteomics
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Holtfreter, S.; Kolata, J.; Stentzel, S.; Bauerfeind, S.; Schmidt, F.; Sundaramoorthy, N.; Bröker, B.M. Omics Approaches for the Study of Adaptive Immunity to Staphylococcus aureus and the Selection of Vaccine Candidates. Proteomes 2016, 4, 11.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Proteomes EISSN 2227-7382 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top