Next Article in Journal
Development of pGEMINI, a Plant Gateway Destination Vector Allowing the Simultaneous Integration of Two cDNA via a Single LR-Clonase Reaction
Next Article in Special Issue
Climate Modelling Shows Increased Risk to Eucalyptus sideroxylon on the Eastern Coast of Australia Compared to Eucalyptus albens
Previous Article in Journal
Genus-Specific Real-Time PCR and HRM Assays to Distinguish Liriope from Ophiopogon Samples
Previous Article in Special Issue
Diffusive and Metabolic Constraints to Photosynthesis in Quinoa during Drought and Salt Stress
Article Menu
Issue 4 (December) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessReview
Plants 2017, 6(4), 54; doi:10.3390/plants6040054

Surviving a Dry Future: Abscisic Acid (ABA)-Mediated Plant Mechanisms for Conserving Water under Low Humidity

1
School of Biological Sciences, University of Tasmania, Hobart TAS 7001, Australia
2
Institute for Molecular Plant Physiology and Biophysics, University of Würzburg, D-97082 Würzburg, Germany
3
Purdue Center for Plant Biology, Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 3 October 2017 / Revised: 29 October 2017 / Accepted: 1 November 2017 / Published: 4 November 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Adaptation to Climate Change)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [792 KB, uploaded 6 November 2017]   |  

Abstract

Angiosperms are able to respond rapidly to the first sign of dry conditions, a decrease in air humidity, more accurately described as an increase in the vapor pressure deficit between the leaf and the atmosphere (VPD), by abscisic acid (ABA)-mediated stomatal closure. The genes underlying this response offer valuable candidates for targeted selection of crop varieties with improved drought tolerance, a critical goal for current plant breeding programs, to maximize crop production in drier and increasingly marginalized environments, and meet the demands of a growing population in the face of a changing climate. Here, we review current understanding of the genetic mechanisms underpinning ABA-mediated stomatal closure, a key means for conserving water under dry conditions, examine how these mechanisms evolved, and discuss what remains to be investigated. View Full-Text
Keywords: stomata; humidity; vapor pressure deficit (VPD); abscisic acid (ABA); 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED); water deficit stress; evolution; sensing water status stomata; humidity; vapor pressure deficit (VPD); abscisic acid (ABA); 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED); water deficit stress; evolution; sensing water status
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Sussmilch, F.C.; McAdam, S.A.M. Surviving a Dry Future: Abscisic Acid (ABA)-Mediated Plant Mechanisms for Conserving Water under Low Humidity. Plants 2017, 6, 54.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Plants EISSN 2223-7747 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top