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ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2018, 7(7), 263; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi7070263

Mapping Creative Spaces in Omaha, NE: Resident Perceptions versus Creative Firm Locations

Department of Geography/Geology, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, NE 68182, USA
Received: 30 May 2018 / Revised: 26 June 2018 / Accepted: 3 July 2018 / Published: 4 July 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Environment Mapping Using GIS)
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Abstract

In an era increasingly shaped by automation and globalization, industries that rely on creativity, innovation, and knowledge-generation are considered key drivers of economic growth in the U.S. and other advanced capitalist economies. This study examines the spatial distribution of creative firms and how they might align with perceptions of creativity in Omaha, Nebraska, a mid-sized U.S. urban area. Utilizing a survey, participant mapping exercise, and geospatial analyses, the primary goal was to identify formal and informal spaces of creative production and consumption, and determine to what extent the location of creative firms (both arts/media- and science/technology-focused) may shape perceptions of creativity across the urban landscape. The results suggest that local area residents primarily view dense, vibrant, mixed-use, and often historic urban neighborhoods as particularly creative, whether or not there exists a dense concentration of creative firms. Similarly, creative firms were more spatially diffuse than the clusters of “creative locations” identified by residents, and were more frequently found in suburban locations. Furthermore, while there was no discernible difference among “creative” and “non-creative” workers, science/technology firms were more likely than arts/media firms to be found in suburban locations, and less likely to be associated with perceptions of creativity in Omaha. View Full-Text
Keywords: creativity; creative class; creative clusters; creative industry; mental maps; cognitive maps; creative spaces; creative firms creativity; creative class; creative clusters; creative industry; mental maps; cognitive maps; creative spaces; creative firms
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Bereitschaft, B. Mapping Creative Spaces in Omaha, NE: Resident Perceptions versus Creative Firm Locations. ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2018, 7, 263.

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