Next Article in Journal
The Potential Phosphorus Crisis: Resource Conservation and Possible Escape Technologies: A Review
Previous Article in Journal
Introduction to a Resources Special Issue on Criticality of the Rare Earth Elements: Current and Future Sources and Recycling
Article Menu
Issue 2 (June) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Resources 2018, 7(2), 36; https://doi.org/10.3390/resources7020036

Implementing Climate-Compatible Development in the Context of Power: Lessons for Encouraging Procedural Justice through Community-Based Projects

Sustainability Research Institute, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 28 March 2018 / Revised: 17 May 2018 / Accepted: 29 May 2018 / Published: 30 May 2018
Full-Text   |   PDF [1462 KB, uploaded 31 May 2018]   |  

Abstract

Climate-compatible development (CCD) is being operationalised across the developing world through projects that integrate development, adaptation and mitigation using community-based approaches—community-based CCD (CB-CCD). By incorporating and considering local people’s concerns, these projects are positioned as more effective, efficient and sustainable than ‘top-down’ climate and development solutions. However, the literature pays little attention to whether and how these projects achieve procedural justice by recognising local people’s identities, cultures and values; and providing local people with meaningful participatory opportunities. We address this gap through an analysis of two donor-funded CB-CCD projects in Malawi, drawing on household surveys, semi-structured interviews and documentary materials. Our findings show that the projects had only limited success in facilitating procedural justice for the target populations. Households’ meaningful engagement in project activities and decision-making was often curtailed because power asymmetries went unchallenged. While many households were well engaged in projects, the recognition and participation of others—including many of the most vulnerable households—was limited. Building on our findings, we present a six-step approach to help CB-CCD project staff understand, manage and challenge power asymmetries; and create widespread recognition of, and meaningful participatory opportunities for, local people. View Full-Text
Keywords: social justice; climate change; mitigation; adaptation; equity; triple-wins; trade-offs; international development; participation; fairness social justice; climate change; mitigation; adaptation; equity; triple-wins; trade-offs; international development; participation; fairness
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Wood, B.T.; Dougill, A.J.; Stringer, L.C.; Quinn, C.H. Implementing Climate-Compatible Development in the Context of Power: Lessons for Encouraging Procedural Justice through Community-Based Projects. Resources 2018, 7, 36.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Resources EISSN 2079-9276 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top