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Resources 2017, 6(1), 4; doi:10.3390/resources6010004

State-Level Forestry Cost-Share Programs and Economic Impact of Increased Timber Outputs: A South Carolina Case Study

1
Department of Forestry and Environmental Conservation, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634, USA
2
South Carolina Forestry Commission, Columbia, SC 29212, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Lindsay C. Stringer
Received: 14 October 2016 / Revised: 4 December 2016 / Accepted: 8 January 2017 / Published: 18 January 2017
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [695 KB, uploaded 18 January 2017]   |  

Abstract

Management of family forests in the United States has been long-influenced by public policies and programs that encourage active management on these private lands, especially afforestation of idle lands and reforestation of cut-over lands. Financial incentive programs to encourage family forest reforestation date back to the 1940s, and in the beginning were funded by the federal government. Beginning in the early 1970s, state governments, especially those with strong forestry-based economies, saw a need to offer their own incentives, primarily cost-share programs to increase forest productivity. These programs are considered to be successful, but little research addresses the value and increased timber supply that result from the state investment. Here, we use historical data from the South Carolina Forest Renewal Program (FRP), one of the oldest and well-established state forestry cost-share programs, to determine the incremental timber outputs generated. Marginal analysis was used to produce financial comparison between regeneration options that include cost-share and those that do not. Annual funding for the FRP is currently $1,000,000 and in the long-run five dollars of economic impact is created for each dollar invested, and over a half million tons of additional wood is added to the annual timber supply. View Full-Text
Keywords: forestry incentive programs; state forestry cost-share programs; family forest owners; nonindustrial private forest; reforestation; South Carolina forestry incentive programs; state forestry cost-share programs; family forest owners; nonindustrial private forest; reforestation; South Carolina
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Stoots, B.G.; Straka, T.J.; Phillips, S.L. State-Level Forestry Cost-Share Programs and Economic Impact of Increased Timber Outputs: A South Carolina Case Study. Resources 2017, 6, 4.

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