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Nanomaterials 2017, 7(10), 288; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano7100288

Stealth Biocompatible Si-Based Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications

1
CNRS, IRD, Coll de France, CEREGE, Aix Marseille Université, 13545, Aix en Provence, France
2
Institut Charles Gerhardt Montpellier, UMR 5253 CNRS-ENSCM-UM, Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie Montpellier, 8 rue de l’Ecole Normale, 34296 Montpellier, France
3
Institut des Biomolécules Max Mousseron, UMR 5247 CNRS-UM, 15 Avenue Charles Flahault, BP 14491, 34093 Montpellier CEDEX 05, France
4
NanoMedSyn, 15 Avenue Charles Flahault, BP 14491, 34093 Montpellier CEDEX 05, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 31 August 2017 / Revised: 18 September 2017 / Accepted: 20 September 2017 / Published: 23 September 2017
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Abstract

A challenge regarding the design of nanocarriers for drug delivery is to prevent their recognition by the immune system. To improve the blood residence time and prevent their capture by organs, nanoparticles can be designed with stealth properties using polymeric coating. In this study, we focused on the influence of surface modification with polyethylene glycol and/or mannose on the stealth behavior of porous silicon nanoparticles (pSiNP, ~200 nm). In vivo biodistribution of pSiNPs formulations were evaluated in mice 5 h after intravenous injection. Results indicated that the distribution in the organs was surface functionalization-dependent. Pristine pSiNPs and PEGylated pSiNPs were distributed mainly in the liver and spleen, while mannose-functionalized pSiNPs escaped capture by the spleen, and had higher blood retention. The most efficient stealth behavior was observed with PEGylated pSiNPs anchored with mannose that were the most excreted in urine at 5 h. The biodegradation kinetics evaluated in vitro were in agreement with these in vivo observations. The biocompatibility of the pristine and functionalized pSiNPs was confirmed in vitro on human cell lines and in vivo by cytotoxic and systemic inflammation investigations, respectively. With their biocompatibility, biodegradability, and stealth properties, the pSiNPs functionalized with mannose and PEG show promising potential for biomedical applications. View Full-Text
Keywords: porous silicon nanoparticle; surface functionalization; PEG; mannose; stealth properties; biodegradation kinetic; biocompatibility porous silicon nanoparticle; surface functionalization; PEG; mannose; stealth properties; biodegradation kinetic; biocompatibility
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Liu, W.; Chaix, A.; Gary-Bobo, M.; Angeletti, B.; Masion, A.; Da Silva, A.; Daurat, M.; Lichon, L.; Garcia, M.; Morère, A.; El Cheikh, K.; Durand, J.-O.; Cunin, F.; Auffan, M. Stealth Biocompatible Si-Based Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications. Nanomaterials 2017, 7, 288.

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