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Challenges, Volume 2, Issue 1 (March 2011), Pages 1-42

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Research

Open AccessArticle Using a Mobile Laboratory to Study Mental Health, Addictions and Violence: A Research Plan
Challenges 2011, 2(1), 1-18; doi:10.3390/challe2010001
Received: 27 October 2010 / Revised: 11 November 2010 / Accepted: 15 December 2010 / Published: 19 January 2011
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (162 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper describes an innovative new research program, Researching Health in Ontario Communities (RHOC), designed to improve understanding, treatment and prevention of co-occurring mental health, addictions, and violence problems. RHOC brings together a multi-disciplinary team of investigators to implement an integrated series of
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This paper describes an innovative new research program, Researching Health in Ontario Communities (RHOC), designed to improve understanding, treatment and prevention of co-occurring mental health, addictions, and violence problems. RHOC brings together a multi-disciplinary team of investigators to implement an integrated series of research studies (including pilot studies and full studies). The project involves use a mobile research laboratory to collect a wide range of biological, behavioral and social data in diverse communities across Ontario, Canada, including remote and rural communities, areas experiencing poverty and social disorganization, urban areas, and Aboriginal communities. This paper describes the project background and research plan as well as the anticipated contributions of the project to participating Ontario communities and to broader scientific knowledge. Full article
Open AccessArticle Long-Time Data Storage: Relevant Time Scales
Challenges 2011, 2(1), 19-36; doi:10.3390/challe2010019
Received: 8 October 2010 / Accepted: 24 January 2011 / Published: 7 February 2011
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (222 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Dynamic processes relevant for long-time storage of information about human kind are discussed, ranging from biological and geological processes to the lifecycle of stars and the expansion of the universe. Major results are that life will end ultimately and the remaining time that
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Dynamic processes relevant for long-time storage of information about human kind are discussed, ranging from biological and geological processes to the lifecycle of stars and the expansion of the universe. Major results are that life will end ultimately and the remaining time that the earth is habitable for complex life is about half a billion years. A system retrieved within the next million years will be read by beings very closely related to Homo sapiens. During this time the surface of the earth will change making it risky to place a small number of large memory systems on earth; the option to place it on the moon might be more favorable. For much longer timescales both options do not seem feasible because of geological processes on the earth and the flux of small meteorites to the moon. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human Document Project)
Open AccessCommunication How to Preserve Documents: A Short Meditation on Three Themes
Challenges 2011, 2(1), 37-42; doi:10.3390/challe2010037
Received: 4 January 2011 / Revised: 23 February 2011 / Accepted: 25 February 2011 / Published: 2 March 2011
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Abstract
The capability to present electronic media that can preserve information is highly restricted to few decades (e.g., a lifetime of DVD media does not exceed 100 years), and therefore the question of how to preserve documents for more than thousands or millions of
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The capability to present electronic media that can preserve information is highly restricted to few decades (e.g., a lifetime of DVD media does not exceed 100 years), and therefore the question of how to preserve documents for more than thousands or millions of years presents a challenging task. In this article, we discuss three thinkable possibilities for long-term data storage: (i) self-assembly systems, (ii) chirality, and (iii) nucleic acids. These systems have, in our opinion, added-value regarding functionality and storing capability. Self-assembly systems form 3D structures, which could reflect any information more precisely than a 2D structure, and therefore they could be used as a training information package. Chirality provides the next added value in the possibility of using an interval of for storing the data (fuzzy logic) and could be also interesting in increasing the storage capacity if using compounds with more chiral centers, such as polysaccharides. Finally, nucleic acids represent a method of storage in which the reading step is developed and probably will be still active if people inhabit the Earth, which will realize the whole process of writing/storing and reading easier. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human Document Project)

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