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Religions 2018, 9(9), 251; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel9090251

The Global Influence of the Seventh-Day Adventist Church on Diet

1
Center for Leadership in Health Systems, Loma Linda University School of Public Health, Loma Linda, CA 92350, USA
2
Center for Nutrition, Healthy Lifestyle and Disease Prevention, Loma Linda University School of Public Health, Loma Linda, CA 92350, USA
3
Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Loma Linda University School of Allied Health Professions, Loma Linda, CA 92350, USA
4
School of Religion, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA 92350, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 9 August 2018 / Accepted: 16 August 2018 / Published: 22 August 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Religion and Food in Global and Historical Perspective )
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Abstract

The emphasis on health ministry within the Seventh-day Adventist (SDA) movement led to the development of sanitariums in mid-nineteenth century America. These facilities, the most notable being in Battle Creek, Michigan, initiated the development of vegetarian foods, such as breakfast cereals and analogue meats. The SDA Church still operates a handful of food production facilities around the world. The first Battle Creek Sanitarium dietitian was co-founder of the American Dietetics Association which ultimately advocated a vegetarian diet. The SDA Church established hundreds of hospitals, colleges, and secondary schools and tens of thousands of churches around the world, all promoting a vegetarian diet. As part of the ‘health message,’ diet continues to be an important aspect of the church’s evangelistic efforts. In addition to promoting a vegetarian diet and abstinence from alcohol, the SDA church has also invested resources in demonstrating the health benefits of these practices through research. Much of that research has been conducted at Loma Linda University in southern California, where there have been three prospective cohort studies conducted over 50 years. The present study, Adventist Health Study-2, enrolled 96,194 Adventists throughout North America in 2003–2004 with funding from the National Institutes of Health. Adventist Health Studies have demonstrated that a vegetarian diet is associated with longer life and better health. View Full-Text
Keywords: vegetarian; Seventh-day Adventist; dietetics; church history; sanitarium; meat analogue; Adventist Health Studies; nutrition guidelines; soy foods; wholism vegetarian; Seventh-day Adventist; dietetics; church history; sanitarium; meat analogue; Adventist Health Studies; nutrition guidelines; soy foods; wholism
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Banta, J.E.; Lee, J.W.; Hodgkin, G.; Yi, Z.; Fanica, A.; Sabate, J. The Global Influence of the Seventh-Day Adventist Church on Diet. Religions 2018, 9, 251.

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