Next Article in Journal
Paganism and Reform in Shakespeare’s Plays
Previous Article in Journal
On the Xiapu Ritual Manual Mani the Buddha of Light
Article Menu
Issue 7 (July) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessReview
Religions 2018, 9(7), 213; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel9070213

Agitators, Tranquilizers, or Something Else: Do Religious Groups Increase or Decrease Contentious Collective Action?

School of Social Sciences, University of Western Australia, Crawley WA 6009, Australia
Received: 8 June 2018 / Revised: 7 July 2018 / Accepted: 9 July 2018 / Published: 10 July 2018
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [279 KB, uploaded 11 July 2018]

Abstract

This article critically assesses existing scholarship on the roles that religious groups play in collective contention. Researchers disagree on three main issues: (a) whether religious doctrines and values make religious groups more or less likely to launch collective contention; (b) whether religious groups reflect and reinforce politically relevant schisms and bring about regime change; and (c) whether the organizational structure of religious groups facilitates or prevents contentious collective action. This article urges researchers in the field (a) to extend their empirical enquiries into polytheistic, pantheistic, and non-theistic religions; (b) to conduct more cross-national and comparative studies; and (c) to think beyond the traditional framework of church–state relations. Calling for challenges to a one-dimensional understanding on the relationship between religious groups and collective contention, this article suggests that a better understanding of this relationship can be achieved by (a) explicitly defining the boundary conditions within which a theory works and (b) embracing a relational perspective that focuses not on religious groups per se but on their interactions with other social and political players. View Full-Text
Keywords: religious groups; contentious politics; social stability; collective contention; value; doctrine; social cleavages; church–state relations; social capital; associational life religious groups; contentious politics; social stability; collective contention; value; doctrine; social cleavages; church–state relations; social capital; associational life
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Tao, Y. Agitators, Tranquilizers, or Something Else: Do Religious Groups Increase or Decrease Contentious Collective Action? Religions 2018, 9, 213.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Religions EISSN 2077-1444 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert Logo copyright Steve Bridenbaugh/UUA
Back to Top