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Religions 2018, 9(5), 168; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel9050168

The Manipulation of Social, Cultural and Religious Values in Socially Mediated Terrorism

1
College of Humanities, Arts and Social Science, Flinders University, Adelaide 5042, Australia
2
Alfred Deakin Institute, Deakin University, Melbourne 3125, Australia
3
Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg 2006, South Africa
4
Universitas Islam Negeri Walisongo, Semarang 50185, Indonesia
5
College of Business, Government and Law, Arts and Social Science, Flinders University, Adelaide 5042, Australia
6
Universitas Padjadjaran, Bandung 45363, Indonesia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 28 March 2018 / Revised: 14 May 2018 / Accepted: 15 May 2018 / Published: 22 May 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Religion and Crime: Theory, Research, and Practice)
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Abstract

This paper presents an analysis of how the Islamic State/Da’esh and Hizb ut-Tahrir Indonesia manipulate conflicting social, cultural and religious values as part of their socially mediated terrorism. It focusses on three case studies: (1) the attacks in Paris, France on 13 November 2015; (2) the destruction of cultural heritage sites in Iraq and Syria; and (3) the struggle between nationalist values and extreme Islamic values in Indonesia. The case studies were chosen as a basis for identifying global commonalities as well as regional differences in socially mediated terrorism. They are located in Asia, the Middle East and Europe. The integrated analysis of these case studies identifies significant trends and suggests actions that could lessen the impact of strategies deployed by extremist groups such as Da’esh, al-Qaeda and Hizb ut-Tahrir. We discuss the broader implications for understanding various aspects of socially mediated terrorism. View Full-Text
Keywords: socially mediated terrorism; the Islamic State; Da’esh; Hizb ut-Tahrir Indonesia; signalling theory; semiotics; cultural heritage; social media; Paris attacks; conflict in Syria and Iraq socially mediated terrorism; the Islamic State; Da’esh; Hizb ut-Tahrir Indonesia; signalling theory; semiotics; cultural heritage; social media; Paris attacks; conflict in Syria and Iraq
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Smith, C.; von der Borch, R.; Isakhan, B.; Sukendar, S.; Sulistiyanto, P.; Ravenscrroft, I.; Widianingsih, I.; de Leiuen, C. The Manipulation of Social, Cultural and Religious Values in Socially Mediated Terrorism. Religions 2018, 9, 168.

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