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Religions 2018, 9(3), 70; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel9030070

Measuring Spirituality and Religiosity in Clinical Settings: A Scoping Review of Available Instruments

1
Department of Pain Management, HammondCare, Greenwich 2065, Australia
2
Department of Palliative Care, HammondCare, Greenwich 2065, Australia
3
Medical School-Northern, The University of Sydney, St Leonard’s 2065, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 22 February 2018 / Revised: 28 February 2018 / Accepted: 28 February 2018 / Published: 4 March 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Measures of Spirituality/Religiosity (2018))
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Abstract

Aims: Numerous measures exist that assess dimensions of spirituality and religiosity in health, theological and social settings. In this review, we aim to identify and evaluate measures assessing factors relating to spirituality and religiosity in clinical settings. Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted using PubMed, EMBASE and PsycINFO databases with search terms relating to spirituality, religiosity that also included well-being, needs, distress and beliefs used in self-reporting and clinician-administered measures. Only articles relating to the validation and subsequent administration of measures used in clinical settings were eligible for review. Results: Of 75 measures selected for initial screening, 25 had been validated and used in clinical settings and were reviewed for this study. Most measures were validated in oncological and palliative care settings where the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy Spiritual Well-being (FACIT-Sp12) and the World Health Organization Quality of Life Spiritual, Religious and Personal Beliefs (WHOQOL-SRPB) were most validated and frequently used. Only six measures were found that assessed spiritual distress and/or the needs of which only two had been investigated more than twice. Two measures assessing spirituality and religious beliefs in healthcare staff were also reviewed. Conclusions: This review provides a current summary of measures evaluating several dimensions of spirituality and religiosity used in clinical settings. Currently there is a lack of reliable measures evaluating spiritual needs and distress. View Full-Text
Keywords: spirituality; spiritual well-being; religiosity; religious beliefs; clinical setting; evaluation; measurement; scoping review spirituality; spiritual well-being; religiosity; religious beliefs; clinical setting; evaluation; measurement; scoping review
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Austin, P.; Macdonald, J.; MacLeod, R. Measuring Spirituality and Religiosity in Clinical Settings: A Scoping Review of Available Instruments. Religions 2018, 9, 70.

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