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Religions 2017, 8(5), 91; doi:10.3390/rel8050091

“And Thou, all-Shaking Thunder…”A Theological Notation to Lines 1–38 of King Lear, Act III, Scene II

Belmont University, Nashville, TN 37067, USA
Academic Editor: Kevin Hart
Received: 16 August 2016 / Revised: 15 February 2017 / Accepted: 8 May 2017 / Published: 11 May 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue English Poetry and Christianity)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [202 KB, uploaded 11 May 2017]

Abstract

In the dramas of Shakespeare, the madman and the fool speak in prose; wisdom and sanity are properly poeticised. King Lear is no exception: I go some way in providing a theological notation to a crucial moment of Lear’s descent into madness, the fracturing of his blank verse into prose. Is the storm on the heath a representation of the turmoil of his mind? Or is it a theophany, the manifestation of divine displeasure at human foolishness? Finding between the verse and the prose the theological tradition of Christianity will allow us to negotiate this question and to understand a little more clearly the peculiar wisdom of poetry for Christianity. View Full-Text
Keywords: Shakespeare and Theology; Poetry and Religion; Wrath; Foolishness; Hans Blumenberg Shakespeare and Theology; Poetry and Religion; Wrath; Foolishness; Hans Blumenberg
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Hackett, W.C. “And Thou, all-Shaking Thunder…”A Theological Notation to Lines 1–38 of King Lear, Act III, Scene II. Religions 2017, 8, 91.

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