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Religions 2017, 8(5), 80; doi:10.3390/rel8050080

Occupying the Ontological Penumbra: Towards a Postsecular and Theologically Minded Anthropology

1
Anthropology Department, SIL International, 7500 W. Camp Wisdom Road, Dallas, TX 75236, USA
2
Department of Sociology, Philosophy and Anthropology, University of Exeter, Amory Building, Rennes Drive, Exeter, EX4 4RJ, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Tobias Winright
Received: 30 December 2016 / Revised: 10 April 2017 / Accepted: 24 April 2017 / Published: 28 April 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ethnography and Theology)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [253 KB, uploaded 28 April 2017]

Abstract

In the wake of the postsecular turn, we propose to reappraise both the religious as studied in anthropology and how anthropologists who have religious or spiritual interests can contribute to an emerging postsecular anthropology. Such an anthropology recognizes the failure of secularization theory to dissolve the dichotomy between the religious and the secular. We propose that as anthropologists we consciously occupy the ontological penumbra, an ambiguous and plural space in which we engage with various counterparts, both human and nonhuman. This means that we have to be open to the real possibility of the existence of gods, spirits, and other nonhuman entities. These should not only be treated as subjects of study, but also recognized as valid counterparts with whom we can engage in the ethnographic encounter. While this necessitates relinquishing the former privileged position of secular and Western epistemology, it opens up the discipline to a potentially unprecedented ethnographic productivity that is epistemologically and ontologically innovative. Without neglecting its secular heritage, such a theologically minded postsecular anthropology places anthropology in a better position to explore what it is to be human, especially in terms of understanding religious and spiritual experiences. View Full-Text
Keywords: secularism; religion; postsecularism; anthropology; theology; ontology; method secularism; religion; postsecularism; anthropology; theology; ontology; method
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Merz, J.; Merz, S. Occupying the Ontological Penumbra: Towards a Postsecular and Theologically Minded Anthropology. Religions 2017, 8, 80.

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