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Religions 2017, 8(2), 18; doi:10.3390/rel8020018

William Apess, Pequot Pastor: A Native American Revisioning of Christian Nationalism in the Early Republic

Master of Arts Program in the Social Sciences, University of Chicago, Saieh 246, 5757 S. University Ave., Chicago, IL 60637, USA
Received: 29 September 2016 / Accepted: 11 January 2017 / Published: 27 January 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Christian Nationalism in the United States)
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Abstract

Pequot Native and Methodist Minister William Apess has received growing recognition among historians as a unique voice for Native Americans—and minorities in general—during the early Republic. This essay began by inquiring into Apess’s relationship with the Christian nationalism of his day. Extensive readings of Apess’s works, scholarship on all aspects of Apess’s life, and analyses of Christian nationalism during the early Republic initially revealed severe conflict. Apess is fiery in his critique of Anglo American society and religion; he questions the integrity of Christians who treat Native Americans with a double standard. Analyzing Apess’s critiques and his proposed solutions in depth, however, shows that his main problem rests with faulty implementation of genuinely good ideals. Apess’s solutions actually rest on revising and enforcing, not destroying, the main components of Christian nationalism. This essay concludes that Apess should be read as advancing his own revised form of Christian nationalism; his plan for the future of America and national unity embraced establishing a more perfect Christian union. View Full-Text
Keywords: Christian Nationalism; William Apess; Pilgrims; Puritans; Divine Providence; common law; Methodism; Jacksonian era Christian Nationalism; William Apess; Pilgrims; Puritans; Divine Providence; common law; Methodism; Jacksonian era
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Goodnight, E. William Apess, Pequot Pastor: A Native American Revisioning of Christian Nationalism in the Early Republic. Religions 2017, 8, 18.

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