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Religions 2016, 7(7), 85; doi:10.3390/rel7070085

Towards an Existential Archeology of Capitalist Spirituality

School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Monmouth University, 400 Cedar Ave, West Long Branch, NJ 07764, USA
Academic Editors: Douglas James Davies and Michael J. Thate
Received: 3 April 2016 / Revised: 21 June 2016 / Accepted: 24 June 2016 / Published: 29 June 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Religion and the Individual: Belief, Practice, and Identity)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [263 KB, uploaded 29 June 2016]

Abstract

Throughout his career, Michel Foucault sustained a trenchant critique of Jean-Paul Sartre, whom he accused of arguing that the subject “dispenses (all) significations”. In contrast to existentialism’s interests in subjective consciousness, Foucault pursues an archaeological method which he later develops into a genealogical approach to discourse that emphasizes the institutional practices and forms of knowledge/power that undergird historical epistemes. Taking contemporary networked Capitalism, the discourse of “workplace spirituality”, and the life history of one management reformer as its case studies, this paper turns to the cognitive linguistics of George Lakoff and Mark Johnson in an effort to historicize experiences of neoliberal “spirituality”, as an archaeology of knowledge might, while also attempting to account for intentionality and biography, as existential approaches would. Turning to work in contemporary critical theory, which associates strident anti-humanism in social theory with the rise of neoliberal discourse, I argue that sustained attention to the ways in which personal and social history always entail one another and are mutually arising makes not only for better phenomenology but makes for better critical scholarship as well. View Full-Text
Keywords: workplace spirituality; critical theory; archaeology of knowledge; existentialism; philosophy of the subject; ethnography of capitalism; cognitive linguistics; neoliberalism; religious studies; management theory; religion and capitalism workplace spirituality; critical theory; archaeology of knowledge; existentialism; philosophy of the subject; ethnography of capitalism; cognitive linguistics; neoliberalism; religious studies; management theory; religion and capitalism
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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González, G. Towards an Existential Archeology of Capitalist Spirituality. Religions 2016, 7, 85.

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