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Religions 2015, 6(2), 365-384; doi:10.3390/rel6020365
Article

Distal and Proximal Religiosity as Protective Factors for Adolescent and Emerging Adult Alcohol Use

1,* , 2,†
,
3,†
 and
4,5
1 Wellesley Centers for Women, Wellesley College, 106 Central St., Cheever House, Wellesley, MA 02481, USA 2 Boston Medical Center, Dowling Building, 9th Floor, Boston, MA 02118, USA 3 UMASS Memorial Medical Center, Department of Psychiatry, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 55 Lake Avenue North, Worcester, MA 01655, USA 4 Systems & Psychosocial Advances Research Center, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Department of Psychiatry, 55 Lake Avenue North, Worcester, MA 01655, USA 5 Department of Sociology, Clark University, 950 Main Street, Worcester, MA 01610, USA These authors contributed equally to this work.
* Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Chris Cook and Wendy Dossett
Received: 7 January 2015 / Revised: 16 March 2015 / Accepted: 24 March 2015 / Published: 2 April 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Religion & Addiction)
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Abstract

Data from emerging adults (ages 18–29, N = 900) in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication Study was used to examine the influence of childhood and emerging adult religiosity and religious-based decision-making, and childhood adversity, on alcohol use. Childhood religiosity was protective against early alcohol use and progression to later abuse or dependence, but did not significantly offset the influence of childhood adversity on early patterns of heavy drinking in adjusted logistic regression models. Religiosity in emerging adulthood was negatively associated with alcohol use disorders. Protective associations for religiosity varied by gender, ethnicity and childhood adversity histories. Higher religiosity may be protective against early onset alcohol use and later development of alcohol problems, thus, should be considered in prevention programming for youth, particularly in faith-based settings. Mental health providers should allow for integration of clients’ religiosity and spirituality beliefs and practices in treatment settings if clients indicate such interest.
Keywords: addiction; adolescence; alcohol use; childhood adversity; emerging adulthood; religion; spirituality addiction; adolescence; alcohol use; childhood adversity; emerging adulthood; religion; spirituality
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 4.0).
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Porche, M.V.; Fortuna, L.R.; Wachholtz, A.; Stone, R.T. Distal and Proximal Religiosity as Protective Factors for Adolescent and Emerging Adult Alcohol Use. Religions 2015, 6, 365-384.

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