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Religions 2012, 3(3), 646-661; doi:10.3390/rel3030646
Article

Penitence, Confession, and the Power of Submission in Late Medieval Women's Religious Communities

Received: 7 July 2012; in revised form: 23 July 2012 / Accepted: 25 July 2012 / Published: 6 August 2012
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Women and Religious Authority)
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Abstract: This article argues that depictions of penance and confession in late medieval "Sisterbooks," which were written by women religious for communal use, show that medieval women understood religious authority to be enhanced through submission and service to community members. These collections of the lives and reminiscences of deceased sisters and father confessors construct idealized piety and religious authority through public acts of obedience and submission which built a reputation for sanctity, not just for the individual penitent, but for her entire community. Thus in the Sisterbooks, obedience to a confessor or spiritual director for both male and female penitents shifts the locus of spiritual authority from the confessor to the penitent and her community through communal observation and evaluation. These medieval Christian women understood the relationships between confessors and confessants as one which conferred power and authority to the penitent, complicating Foucault's influential claim that the sacrament of confession granted all power to the confessor who heard sins in secret. In the Sisterbooks, interactions between women religious and their confessors are depicted as relational, complex, and constantly in flux.
Keywords: women; gender; authority; leadership; power; religion/religious; confession; Medieval Convents; Sisterbooks; women authors; Medieval Christianity women; gender; authority; leadership; power; religion/religious; confession; Medieval Convents; Sisterbooks; women authors; Medieval Christianity
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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MDPI and ACS Style

Gregory, R. Penitence, Confession, and the Power of Submission in Late Medieval Women's Religious Communities. Religions 2012, 3, 646-661.

AMA Style

Gregory R. Penitence, Confession, and the Power of Submission in Late Medieval Women's Religious Communities. Religions. 2012; 3(3):646-661.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Gregory, Rabia. 2012. "Penitence, Confession, and the Power of Submission in Late Medieval Women's Religious Communities." Religions 3, no. 3: 646-661.


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