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J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2018, 6(2), 39; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse6020039

Deployment and Maintenance of Wave Energy Converters at the Lysekil Research Site: A Comparative Study on the Use of Divers and Remotely-Operated Vehicles

Division for Electricity, Uppsala University, Box 534, 75121 Uppsala, Sweden
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Received: 15 February 2018 / Revised: 20 March 2018 / Accepted: 26 March 2018 / Published: 12 April 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Ocean Wave Energy Conversion)
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Abstract

Ocean renewable technologies have been rapidly developing over the past years. However, current high installation, operation, maintenance, and decommissioning costs are hindering these offshore technologies to reach a commercialization stage. In this paper we focus on the use of divers and remotely-operated vehicles during the installation and monitoring phase of wave energy converters. Methods and results are based on the wave energy converter system developed by Uppsala University, and our experience in offshore deployments obtained during the past eleven years. The complexity of underwater operations, carried out by either divers or remotely-operated vehicles, is emphasized. Three methods for the deployment of wave energy converters are economically and technically analyzed and compared: one using divers alone, a fully-automated approach using remotely-operated vehicles, and an intermediate approach, involving both divers and underwater vehicles. The monitoring of wave energy converters by robots is also studied, both in terms of costs and technical challenges. The results show that choosing an autonomous deployment method is more advantageous than a diver-assisted method in terms of operational time, but that numerous factors prevent the wide application of robotized operations. Technical solutions are presented to enable the use of remotely-operated vehicles instead of divers in ocean renewable technology operations. Economically, it is more efficient to use divers than autonomous vehicles for the deployment of six or fewer wave energy converters. From seven devices, remotely-operated vehicles become advantageous. View Full-Text
Keywords: wave energy; diving; ROV; operation and maintenance; wave energy converter; deployment wave energy; diving; ROV; operation and maintenance; wave energy converter; deployment
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Rémouit, F.; Chatzigiannakou, M.-A.; Bender, A.; Temiz, I.; Sundberg, J.; Engström, J. Deployment and Maintenance of Wave Energy Converters at the Lysekil Research Site: A Comparative Study on the Use of Divers and Remotely-Operated Vehicles. J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2018, 6, 39.

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