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J. Clin. Med. 2017, 6(10), 98; doi:10.3390/jcm6100098

Production and Use of Hymenolepis diminuta Cysticercoids as Anti-Inflammatory Therapeutics

1
University Program in Ecology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
2
Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
3
The Duke Brain Imaging & Analysis Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
4
Mental Illness Research Education and Clinical Center for Post Deployment Mental Health, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
5
Department of Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
6
Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Emmanuel Andrès
Received: 4 September 2017 / Revised: 4 October 2017 / Accepted: 17 October 2017 / Published: 24 October 2017
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [2618 KB, uploaded 24 October 2017]   |  

Abstract

Helminthic therapy has shown considerable promise as a means of alleviating some inflammatory diseases that have proven resistant to pharmaceutical intervention. However, research in the field has been limited by a lack of availability to clinician scientists of a helminth that is relatively benign, non-communicable, affordable, and effectively treats disease. Previous socio-medical studies have found that some individuals self-treating with helminths to alleviate various diseases are using the rat tapeworm (cysticercoid developmental stage of Hymenolepis diminuta; HDC). In this study, we describe the production and use of HDCs in a manner that is based on reports from individuals self-treating with helminths, individuals producing helminths for self-treatment, and physicians monitoring patients that are self-treating. The helminth may fit the criteria needed by clinical scientists for clinical trials, and the methodology is apparently feasible for any medical center to reproduce. It is hoped that future clinical trials using this organism may shed light on the potential for helminthic therapy to alleviate inflammatory diseases. Further, it is hoped that studies with HDCs may provide a stepping stone toward population-wide restoration of the biota of the human body, potentially reversing the inflammatory consequences of biota depletion that currently affect Western society. View Full-Text
Keywords: helminthic therapy; helminth; biological therapeutic; inflammation; anti-inflammatory helminthic therapy; helminth; biological therapeutic; inflammation; anti-inflammatory
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Smyth, K.; Morton, C.; Mathew, A.; Karuturi, S.; Haley, C.; Zhang, M.; Holzknecht, Z.E.; Swanson, C.; Lin, S.S.; Parker, W. Production and Use of Hymenolepis diminuta Cysticercoids as Anti-Inflammatory Therapeutics. J. Clin. Med. 2017, 6, 98.

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