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J. Clin. Med., Volume 1, Issue 1 (December 2012), Pages 1-23

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial Journal of Clinical Medicine Editorial
J. Clin. Med. 2012, 1(1), 22-23; doi:10.3390/jcm1010022
Received: 17 December 2012 / Accepted: 18 December 2012 / Published: 18 December 2012
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Abstract
“Why yet another journal?” Because this new journal will be different in that we are not just about new information but about understanding new information. We are online, peer reviewed, with a quick turnaround time from submission to publication and without any [...] Read more.
“Why yet another journal?” Because this new journal will be different in that we are not just about new information but about understanding new information. We are online, peer reviewed, with a quick turnaround time from submission to publication and without any limit regarding length! Therefore, I am honored to introduce the Journal of Clinical Medicine (JCM), which has been created to serve as a hub for disseminating new findings and discoveries in clinical medicine to clinicians and medical researchers worldwide. [...] Full article

Research

Jump to: Editorial, Other

Open AccessArticle Bone Marrow Transplantation Alters the Tremor Phenotype in the Murine Model of Globoid-Cell Leukodystrophy
J. Clin. Med. 2012, 1(1), 1-14; doi:10.3390/jcm1010001
Received: 9 December 2011 / Revised: 7 January 2012 / Accepted: 11 January 2012 / Published: 19 January 2012
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (2854 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Tremor is a prominent phenotype of the twitcher mouse, an authentic genetic model of Globoid-Cell Leukodystrophy (GLD, Krabbe’s disease). In the current study, the tremor was quantified using a force-plate actometer designed to accommodate low-weight mice. The actometer records the force oscillations [...] Read more.
Tremor is a prominent phenotype of the twitcher mouse, an authentic genetic model of Globoid-Cell Leukodystrophy (GLD, Krabbe’s disease). In the current study, the tremor was quantified using a force-plate actometer designed to accommodate low-weight mice. The actometer records the force oscillations caused by a mouse’s movements, and the rhythmic structure of the force variations can be revealed. Results showed that twitcher mice had significantly increased power across a broad band of higher frequencies compared to wildtype mice. Bone marrow transplantation (BMT), the only available therapy for GLD, worsened the tremor in the twitcher mice and induced a measureable alteration of movement phenotype in the wildtype mice. These data highlight the damaging effects of conditioning radiation and BMT in the neonatal period. The behavioral methodology used herein provides a quantitative approach for assessing the efficacy of potential therapeutic interventions for Krabbe’s disease. Full article
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Other

Jump to: Editorial, Research

Open AccessCase Report Hemobilia Secondary to Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Procedure: A Case Report
J. Clin. Med. 2012, 1(1), 15-21; doi:10.3390/jcm1010015
Received: 3 August 2012 / Revised: 18 September 2012 / Accepted: 20 September 2012 / Published: 10 October 2012
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Abstract
A 59 year-old woman with liver cirrhosis due to hepatitis C, complicated by refractory hepatic hydrothorax was treated with a TIPS (transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt) procedure. The procedure was complicated by substantial gastrointestinal hemorrhage. EGD (esophagogastroduodenoscopy) was performed and revealed hemobilia. A [...] Read more.
A 59 year-old woman with liver cirrhosis due to hepatitis C, complicated by refractory hepatic hydrothorax was treated with a TIPS (transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt) procedure. The procedure was complicated by substantial gastrointestinal hemorrhage. EGD (esophagogastroduodenoscopy) was performed and revealed hemobilia. A hepatic angiogram was then performed revealing a fistulous tract between a branch of the hepatic artery and biliary tree. Bleeding was successfully stopped by embolization of the bleeding branch of the right hepatic artery. Hemobilia is a rare cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding with an increasing incidence due to the widespread use of invasive hepatobiliary procedures. Hemobilia is an especially uncommon complication of TIPS procedures. We recommend that in cases of hemobilia after TIPS placement, a physician should immediately evaluate the bleeding to exclude an arterio-biliary fistula. Full article

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