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Antioxidants 2016, 5(4), 37; doi:10.3390/antiox5040037

Protective Role of Dietary Berries in Cancer

1
Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Istanbul Yeni Yuzyil University, Yilanli Ayasma Caddesi No. 26, Istanbul 34010, Turkey
2
Food Science and Human Nutrition, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Stanley Omaye
Received: 30 June 2016 / Revised: 24 September 2016 / Accepted: 11 October 2016 / Published: 19 October 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Berry Antioxidants in Health and Disease)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1645 KB, uploaded 23 June 2017]   |  

Abstract

Dietary patterns, including regular consumption of particular foods such as berries as well as bioactive compounds, may confer specific molecular and cellular protection in addition to the overall epidemiologically observed benefits of plant food consumption (lower rates of obesity and chronic disease risk), further enhancing health. Mounting evidence reports a variety of health benefits of berry fruits that are usually attributed to their non-nutritive bioactive compounds, mainly phenolic substances such as flavonoids or anthocyanins. Although it is still unclear which particular constituents are responsible for the extended health benefits, it appears that whole berry consumption generally confers some anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory protection to humans and animals. With regards to cancer, studies have reported beneficial effects of berries or their constituents including attenuation of inflammation, inhibition of angiogenesis, protection from DNA damage, as well as effects on apoptosis or proliferation rates of malignant cells. Berries extend effects on the proliferation rates of both premalignant and malignant cells. Their effect on premalignant cells is important for their ability to cause premalignant lesions to regress both in animals and in humans. The present review focuses primarily on in vivo and human dietary studies of various berry fruits and discusses whether regular dietary intake of berries can prevent cancer initiation and delay progression in humans or ameliorate patients’ cancer status. View Full-Text
Keywords: antioxidants; anthocyanins; cancer; chemoprevention; edible berries; flavonoids; phytochemicals antioxidants; anthocyanins; cancer; chemoprevention; edible berries; flavonoids; phytochemicals
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Kristo, A.S.; Klimis-Zacas, D.; Sikalidis, A.K. Protective Role of Dietary Berries in Cancer. Antioxidants 2016, 5, 37.

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